The Benefits of an MBA for Startups and Entrepreneurs

Common folklore surrounding what it takes to start a business is awash with one familiar motif: the dropout-turned-billionaire entrepreneur. 

Indeed, when enterprising individuals come of age and start contemplating business ideas, their dreams often adopt this narrative.

For a long time now, a contrast has been cast between two groups of people. In one corner, those who spend a significant part of their lives furnishing their educational backgrounds. And in the other, those who choose to act on their entrepreneurial dreams.

Still, many aspiring business owners have pursued a Master of Business Administration. They’ve done this to better equip themselves in their role as startup runners.

The evidence supporting this trend goes beyond the anecdotal. 

For this reason, we think it’s important to understand what use an MBA could be to those in the startup world — whether well established or still aspiring. 

Is an MBA Worth it?

What’s the Remuneration Like as an MBA Holder?

First off, is getting an MBA worthwhile to your earnings? 

QS World Rankings conducted a survey to assess the revenues earned by entrepreneurs holding an MBA. The pay averaged $106,000 per annum, without aggregation across regions.

Here’s a more specific lowdown of the yearly revenue across countries:

  • USA: US$ 102,100 per annum
  • Italy: US$ 86,400 per annum
  • France: US$ 98,500 per annum
  • Germany: US$ 77,200 per annum
  • Switzerland: US$ 123,500 per annum
  • The UK: US$ 92,400 per annum
  • Singapore: US$ 82,700 per annum
  • Australia: US$ 98,400 per annum
  • Canada: US$ 99,800 per annum

Promising, no? It even makes the prospect of repaying your tuition loan a little more plausible.

But here’s the rub: Pursuing an MBA is quite an investment. The fees can get pretty steep. 

Especially if you opt for an ivy league school — most of which offer a curriculum no different than any other university.

That said, the investment of pursuing an MBA is worth it. And to prove this, we’ll look at five of the world’s most renowned MBA holders.

Four of The World’s Most Renowned MBAs

Michael Bloomberg

An American philanthropist, former politician, and business magnate, Michael Rubens Bloomberg is well known within entrepreneurial circles. 

He’s the sole owner and founder of Bloomberg LP, a company that supplies financial data to investment companies and other entities.

He currently has a net worth of $40 billion and earned his MBA in 1966.

Phil Knight

Are you filled with gratitude for your Nikes and have perhaps wondered in the past who to thank? 

This is the guy. 

To say that Phil Knight’s shoe brand has been successful is quite an understatement. It started as a small shoe retail outlet in 1964. And under his long stewardship, it has grown into a billion-dollar conglomerate.

As an individual, Phil Knight is worth well over $45 billion. He owes his business acumen at least partly to his MBA, which he acquired in 1966. 

Melinda Gates

Perhaps one of the world’s most well-known philanthropists, Melinda Gates has carved out her niche within the business management world. 

She graduated with an MBA in 1987. Since then, she has worked with Microsoft and the charitable startups she co-chairs, including the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. There’s a long list of entities to which she has dedicated her entrepreneurial expertise.

Tim Cook

Tim Cook took up the role of Apple CEO following founder Steve Jobs in 2011. Those were some pretty big shoes to fill, to say the least.

Since then, he’s not only made good on Jobs’ vision for the largest tech conglomerate in the world — he has also steered Apple away from ethically grey manufacturing practices. 

He’s been featured multiple times on the list of Fortune 500 CEOs. And is well known as a torchbearer for equality and civil and LGBT rights within the mainstream tech world. 

Important Things to Consider Before Enrolling in Business Schools 

How Long Is the Program?

The length of your program determines how quickly you will resume your entrepreneurial work. It also determines the density of your course requirements.

In colleges with shorter entrepreneurship MBA programs, students will typically spend six hours per day studying in class. While in programs of standard length students will typically spend half that: approximately three hours.

Though it varies between colleges, an MBA program runs for an average of between 11 and 16 months. 

Where Is the Business School Located?

Your location determines the availability of your chosen specialization and the quality of education you have access to. 

Indeed, a UK citizen residing in the capital will enjoy access to top business courses. Just as a Californian seeking to do a tech MBA will benefit immensely exactly where they live.

That said, there is still a lot to reap from living in a more rural environment. 

Does the Tuition Cost to Return-on-Investment Look Favorable?

When assessing the return on investment of such an important financial decision, it’s vital to think beyond the prospect of revenue.

Sure, it’s important to choose an MBA in entrepreneurship program with a sustainable tuition tag. But the applications of an entrepreneurship MBA towards running your business are, in large part, analytical. And therefore individual.

Unlike MBA students looking to enter the job market, your goals are directed towards starting a business. And eventually, making everyday entrepreneurial decisions.

What Are Your Strengths and Interests?

There are numerous MBA specialization areas.

Think of it like this: If you can start a business in a subject, it can be studied and mastered. Finance. Tech. Textile design and manufacturing. Financial accounting and consultancy. Legal management; you name it.

It’s essential to have some idea of what your interests are. Which, of course, will almost always be wholly determined by your specific field of business.

Best MBA Programs

In addition to an MBA for entrepreneurship, there are several other specialized fields to choose from:

  • IT (Information Technology)
  • International Business
  • Corporate Management
  • Marketing 
  • Finance 
  • Operations Management

Jobs for Entrepreneurs with MBAs

The jobs most suited and most accessible by MBA graduates include:

  • Financial Consultant/Analyst – manages the firm’s accounting department and advises proprietors
  • Marketing Manager – oversees advertisement development and product marketing strategies
  • Research Manager – helps in budgeting, business plan formulation, and overseeing research projects
  • Non-Profit Manager – organizes events to raise funds for various causes
  • IT Department Head – managees developer teams; delegates and supervises business tasks
  • Human Resource Manager — coordinates staff issues for startups, both internal and contracted

MBA for Entrepreneurship vs Actual Entrepreneurship: Myths Dispelled

Myth #1: You Must Pick One Path: School or Entrepreneurship

Ah yes. So the fallacy goes. While the rest of the world trudges on with actual entrepreneurial work, MBA students extricate themselves. For two years, they’re fed all there is to know about starting and running a new business.

But on closer inspection, this contrast of school vs. experience is not entirely valid. The theory comes tainted from the source. 

For one, the first most important requirement for an entrepreneur is, and will always be, an appetite for prudent, calculated risk.

A decent case can be made that you’d be in a sufficient fiscal position after finishing your degree to start and run a new business. 

About this question of time and value, Seth Godin says

Myth #2: Traditional MBA Programs Trump Online MBA Programs

Not so. Truth is, many graduate business students set their sights only on a traditional, on-campus MBA at a brick-and-mortar school. 

If we allow for a grander comparison, there are over 1,000 MBA programs in the United States. 

Some are full-time, while others are part-time, often offering classes on nights and weekends. 

Here at Quantic, we offer both an innovative free online program as well as an online executive program.

But, just like the world of business itself, MBA programs are changing rapidly. There are now over 330 online MBAs offered in the U.S — of which Quantic is a top contributor. 

With two accredited, highly selective business degree programs — the free MBA and radically affordable Executive MBA — Quantic’s MBA programs are reliably well-reviewed and readily available online. 

Online MBA Pros

The biggest reason that many entrepreneurs choose an online MBA is for the flexibility. Unlike traditional MBA programs, most online graduate business degrees allow you to work on your own time from anywhere.

Online MBA Cons

One disadvantage of an online MBA program is a lack of in-person community and connection.

MBA students often benefit from in-person conversations with peers and instructors. And that’s both in terms of academic collaboration and socializing. Fortunately, the Executive MBA also offers multiple weekend-long conferences held in cities around the world.

Traditional MBA Pros

In traditional business schools, MBA programs often appeal to students who want a little more hands-on guidance. 

Fresh undergraduates from top business schools might prefer the additional in-person attention. At least that which is offered by a brick-and-mortar school, as well as the familiar daily routine of face-to-face classes. 

Traditional MBA Cons

Of course, the most significant disadvantage of on-campus MBA programs is the lack of flexibility. 

Say you have a family at home, existing business obligations, or a burgeoning career. For these students, it can be difficult to justify starting a full-time MBA program.

Traditional business schools offering MBAs also tend to host younger students on average and there aren’t as many international students at any given on-campus program. 

Benefits of an MBA

At its most efficacious, an MBA will equip its holder with an exhaustive, well-rounded set of entrepreneurial tools. 

Here’s what you can expect to gain from an MBA: 

Firm Conceptual Foundation to Start & Run Your Business

MBAs are meant for aspiring corporate climbers just as much as aspiring entrepreneurs. And its core units are designed with either end in mind. 

An MBA is as credible a tag as you can earn to validate your ability to steer businesses in any (and more) of these fields. And that’s regardless of your eventual course of trade. Whether mechanical operations, marketing and branding, financial services, communications, corporate law, even IT.

A recent study that profiled nearly 40 new businesses reliably found that, of those started within the past decade or so, at least 33% had an MBA-holding founder.

Essential Skills and Insights for Entrepreneurship and Innovation

The world is awash with people hiding truly innovative ideas. The trouble is that most people lack the basic knowledge needed to be competitive in the real world.

An MBA will serve the crucial role of equipping you with the right know-how to see your ideas to fruition. Specifically, that which is needed to manipulate the market, find a niche and make it sustainably profitable.

Indeed, like most other fields, entrepreneurial knowledge is a priori — the concepts are testable, predictable, and hence actionable. And an MBA will go a long way in giving you the innate ability to pattern out your businesses’ course in just this way.

Practical Communication, Leadership, and Problem Solving Skills

There’s no other way to make something meaningful out of your new businesses — you need the ability to communicate efficiently. 

Regardless of your line of trade, if you do indeed want to accrue enough venture capital to bring your business ideas into fruition, you need to learn how to convince investors of the soundness of your product, service, or business plan. 

Additionally, as a startup founder, you will need to learn how to manage teams of workers. And just as well, you’ll need the conceptual tools needed to understand the scale of a problem, scope out its dimensions, and determine how best to tackle it. 

With an MBA from Quantic, you will gain the skills of interpersonal communication, teamwork and collaboration, adaptive thinking — and that’s just some of the tools in the MBA’s holster.

Extra Academic Credentials and International Experience to Appeal to Potential Investors and Partners

If you opt to enroll in either one of Quantic’s two MBA programs, it’s an excellent step towards making a credible case for your worth in the international business market. 

An MBA is not only universally recognized as a valuable credential by investors you will eventually pitch to. But it’s also a mark of global exposure and evidence of compatibility with most business environments worldwide. 

Get Started With Your MBA at Quantic

While an MBA is impactful, it’s essential to recognize that it is not a replacement to a business’s uniquely crucial requirements: the confidence to take necessary risks. Nor will it furnish you with the passion needed to see an idea through the inevitable successes and pitfalls.

What it will do, however, is take your leadership skills to the next level. All while building connections in a global community of high-achieving classmates and alumni. 

Quantic’s online MBA program can serve as a game-changer in your business career, and we’re not the only ones saying it

Our premier 13-month degree program is designed for mid-career professionals. It integrates collaborative group projects with our rigorous MBA curriculum and is enhanced with specializations in management, leadership, and advanced strategy. 

And you don’t have to take it from us. Vay Cao, alumni of Quantic Business School and founder of Free the PhD, an advocacy and career development platform for PhDs, has very interesting things to say about her time at our campus. Check out this case study we conducted on her work and startup.

Should I Get an MBA? The True Cost and Benefits of Getting an MBA

MBAs are not for the faint of heart, but they’re more accessible than ever to those up for undertaking this impressive achievement. Thanks to changes in the business world and the nature of education, you have more options to consider when selecting a program.

While the MBA is the ultimate degree in the business world, not all programs are created equal. 

Before you hit the button to apply, make sure you’ve adequately weighed the pros and cons of each option by:

  • Calculating the true ROI of the program
  • Uncovering the real value of the specific degrees offered
  • Identifying what features you need in a program

We’ll show you how to do all three, and provide plenty of other pointers along the way. Let’s dive right in.

How to Calculate the True ROI of an MBA

If you’re looking into different MBA programs, you will notice various discussions about what the “ROI” of an MBA looks like. 

The good news? No matter what area of business you decide to enter, an MBA pays off. You’ll see a return on your investment over the long-run – guaranteed. However, not all MBA programs are created equal, and not all calculate their ROI by including the full value that the program or school offers. 

According to The Princeton Review, the most common way that schools calculate the ROI of their MBA is how long it takes each student to recoup the cost of the program itself. For example, if an MBA program from a major school costs you $50,000 and you land a $100,000 salaried position with it, then that’s considered an extremely high return on your investment because you’ll recoup your costs in a year. In contrast, if it costs you $50,000, but you land a job that pays only $65,000, you may spend five or six years recapturing your expenses. That leads to a lower ROI.

By that logic, the cheaper the program, the greater the ROI – but we all know that isn’t true. 

The return on your investment analysis should also consider opportunities and costs. As you peruse programs, ask yourself about:

  • Career sacrifices: Do I have to stop working to pursue this program? If so, how much will that affect me?
  • Networking opportunities: Will this program allow me to access high-caliber connections in the business world, thereby accessing quality career opportunities? 
  • Electives and specialties: Is the program teaching me the basics, or will I have the chance to take elective courses that help me develop transferable skills?
  • Program match: Is the program appropriate to my specific career path, or is it too basic or too advanced? 

Imagine arriving at your new program only to discover that your professors assume you have certain business expertise that you don’t, or that the career network is non-existent. A program that’s a bad fit for you is just as worthless as a low-quality program that doesn’t give you the skills you need.

With these, you’ll have a better sense of whether a specific program worth it to you. 

The Benefits of Getting an MBA

An MBA can convey several expected and unexpected benefits. In addition to more earning power and access to more high-powered jobs, you will enjoy:

  • A more extensive network of colleagues and friends. An MBA program is a great place to meet connections from all around the world, even your next business partner. (Yelp, OkCupid, and GrubHub were all started by people who met in MBA programs.) 
  • Differentiation in the job market. Depending on your industry, an MBA will set you apart from the competition, presenting you as a strong candidate for your dream job.
  • Improved communication skills. You’ll learn how to communicate professionally, developing better relationships with your bosses, colleagues, or employees.
  • A re-energized career. If you’re feeling stuck in a rut and burned out, an MBA can help you access opportunities that previously stood out of reach. In addition to business acumen, you’ll gain transferable skills that let you be more productive at work.
  • Better job security. Possessing an MBA makes you a more valued member of any team. That translates to a decreased likelihood of losing your job in a turbulent market and helps reduce the time between jobs.

The Hidden Value of an MBA in Today’s Market

In 2019, some of the most prominent schools in the U.S. reported plummeting enrollment rates in their MBA programs. During the same time, tech fields of every stripe represent some of the fastest-growing job markets, and schools report no shortage of applications to their STEM programs.

This trend towards technology-oriented degrees and jobs has left some people asking if MBAs have grown outdated.

They haven’t. 

According to the 2018 Corporate Recruiters Survey, 85 percent of businesses in the U.S. expected to hire an MBA graduate. 

Why Companies Value Employees with MBAs

An MBA does more than just impart practical business knowledge. Companies actively seek out MBA graduates because they:

  • See the big picture. MBA graduates leave school with a mature perspective on business, which makes them useful for understanding things like market context and competition.
  • Think long-term. They know how to plan and how to analyze the ways that actions today will impact tomorrow. (That’s critical if you ever want to become a COO, for example.)
  • Lead teams. MBA students have ample opportunities to develop their leadership skills through real-world projects and internships, making them effective leaders in the workplace.
  • Possess diverse and qualified connections. It’s not just the graduates who benefit from career networks – employers can also tap into the relationships their employees have formed.

Do I Need an MBA to Become an Executive?

No, but it can represent a significant competitive advantage. At least 40 percent of Fortune 500 CEOs sport an MBA on their resume. 

Is an MBA Necessary for Marketing, Finance, Operations, or Engineering?

Increasingly, yes! 

Professionals who come from technical backgrounds like computer science or engineering often overlook MBAs. However, if you’re looking to become a Chief Technical Officer or a Chief Financial Officer, an MBA can prove a powerful combination with your technical degrees and significantly improve the odds of being selected to serve on a board.

What’s the Best Age to Get an MBA?

The best time to get an MBA is after you have some work experience under your belt. 

According to Vanderbilt University, the average age of MBA students is around 28, but it’s not uncommon to see slightly older candidates in programs. According to UCLA, the average age for executive MBA programs is 36.

What Type of MBA Should I Get?

Professionals pursuing MBAs have more options than ever before. That’s great news if you’re trying to find a program that matches your lifestyle and current career demands. In general, you’ve got five options:

1. Traditional MBAs. If you like structure and the hands-on experience of being in a classroom, the traditional MBA is for you. Many people are also attracted to them because of their networking potential.

2. Online MBAs. Competitive online MBAs are increasing in popularity. They’re convenient, especially if you prefer to keep working, but want to go to school full-time. Many now even offer career networking opportunities to connect digitally with your peers.

3. Accelerated MBAs. In an accelerated program, you may take classes right through the summer or take many classes online. Your winter and spring breaks will also be shorter, but you’ll complete the program faster.

4. Part-Time MBAs. Part-time MBAs allow students to keep working while enjoying the structure of a classroom. They often include evening classes and may take longer to complete.

5. Executive MBAs. If you’re already mid-career and are ready to take your next step, an EMBA might be for you. Here’s a closer look at this program geared towards those aspiring to reach executive levels.

Your most significant decision lies in choosing between traditional or online MBAs. We’ve got a few thoughts on that.

How Much Does an MBA Cost?

According to Poets & Quants, the average cost of a traditional MBA program ranges between $50,000 and $80,000 – with nine schools in the U.S. exceeding $200,000 for their programs.

Many major universities also offer very competitive online MBAs. In-state tuition often ranges around $15,000, while out of state tuition averages about twice that amount.

Currently, QUANTIC offers an accredited MBA program online for free. This hyper-competitive program is worth considering if you’re seeking a high-caliber education that offers flexibility and rigor. We also offer an Executive MBA for $9,600, which will prep you for pursuing an executive position.

How Long Does It Take to Get an MBA?

The duration of a program depends on several factors, especially whether you’re attending full-time or part-time. The average lengths of time for different MBAs include:

  • Full-time traditional MBAs: Two full years, or four semesters.
  • Part-time MBAs: Typically, around three years.
  • Accelerated MBAs: Between one and two years.
  • Executive MBAs: Two years.
  • Online MBAs: One year or less. (Our Free MBA takes 10 months.)

Should I Get an MBA in 2020?

If you’re interested in an MBA to further your career, you’ve got more options than ever before. The rise of affordable, online MBAs can be precisely what you need to advance your career. However, MBAs aren’t always appropriate for everyone. It might be the right choice for you if you’re:

  • Encountering more scenarios at work that require deeper business knowledge than you possess.
  • Feeling stuck and not sure how to move your career forward, or you want to change careers.
  • Aiming for an executive-level position in your career.
  • Seeking to broaden your professional opportunities with high-quality business connections.
  • Prepared to face (and feel excited by) the rigors of a program like an MBA.
  • Thinking about one day starting your own business from scratch.

If most or all of these are true, then an MBA could be right for you.

Summary: Choose the Right Degree for Your Career Growth

Pursuing an MBA is a difficult challenge, but one that pays off in the long run. Hopefully, this article has given you some ideas about whether you should get an MBA. 

As with any significant decision, knowledge is power. We’ve explored your options, the different types of MBAs now available, and why attaining one can make you such a valuable employee in the marketplace. You’re now equipped to make the right choice in the next step of your career. Go forth and prosper.

10 Tips To Make the Most of Your Virtual Meetings

This year, many of us started working remotely and are spending far more time in virtual meetings, meet-ups, happy hours, webinars, and social gatherings. Since March, the Quantic Engagement Team, responsible for planning and hosting events for students and alumni, has held over 300 virtual events, averaging around 50 per month. Suffice it to say, they know a few things about making sure a conversation runs smoothly!

To help you better command your virtual conference room, the team has compiled their top ten tips to ensure that everything from your lighting to your muting etiquette go according to plan. 

Arrive on Time

While it’s always ideal to be on time, it can be especially important in virtual meetings. The presenter may set some expectations for meeting etiquette within the first few minutes. Presenters also typically choose to save questions until a particular section or the end of the presentation. Write down your questions so that you don’t forget them.

Limit Distractions

Now that more of us are logging on from home, the amount of distractions has increased. Make sure to find a quiet place to log in to a meeting to ensure that you’re able to stay focused and limit background noise that could interrupt the call. Also, turn off notifications on your device and if you’re used to multitasking, try to resist responding to emails until after the meeting.

Choose a Neutral Background

Don’t distract your viewers with a busy background. Try finding a solid background or one without clutter. You want listeners and viewers to focus on what you’re saying, rather than the books on the shelf behind you.

Consider Your Lighting

If you’re planning to have your video turned on during a meeting, make sure that you are well-lit so that other attendees can easily see you. Find a space facing a window and make sure that the source of light is facing you, rather than coming from the side or behind you. Zoom also recently added a feature that helps you improve your lighting.

Test Your Device with the Meeting Platform

Before logging in to a meeting, make sure to take time to familiarize yourself with the features of the meeting room. Depending on the platform and device, you will want to know how to activate your microphone and video, mute yourself, and share your screen before joining the scheduled meeting. If you’re concerned about your internet connection, check out Zoom’s system requirements and consider running a test on your internet connection.

Add a Display Name

When possible, reset your display name on the account you’re using to join a video call. Otherwise, you may show up as the name of the device (e.g. Samsung 45XT3) rather than your actual name. This makes it difficult for the host or others on the call to identify you.

Use a Profile Picture

If you’re using Zoom or other video conferencing apps, it’s nice to have a profile picture in case you’re not able to share your video. This way other attendees can put a face to the name. It helps to give the meeting a little more personalization.

Mute Yourself

In a large meeting, having multiple mics turned on can sometimes be distracting. Make sure that you’re muted when you’re not speaking. This way it won’t pick up any background noise and you can unmute yourself to ask questions or present your part.

Respect Others on the Call

Reading social cues can be difficult in a virtual setting, but it’s no less important. To prevent interrupting others, keep an eye out for those who unmute their microphones. This is often a sign that they’re about to speak. If you do end up speaking over someone, that’s ok, just make sure to allow them a chance to continue.

Utilize the Chat Tool

If another person is speaking or presenting and you want to make a quick comment or share some information, it may be best to quickly post your idea in the chat box. Note that on Zoom and Google Hangouts you also have the option to send a private note to a specific participant.

During the pandemic, expanding and staying in touch with your network is still as important and essential for our work and well-being. Always remember that we have the tools to create and maintain meaningful connections. As we all become more comfortable connecting virtually, this can even be an excellent time to expand your global network from home.

Five Questions for Free the PhD Founder, Vay Cao

Quantic Alum, Vay Cao, PhD, founded Free the PhD, a career development and advocacy platform for PhDs who want to learn more about the world outside of academia and kickstart an exciting career. You can check out their programs, talk to their advisors, and access their resources year-round.  Vay spoke with us about the initial inspiration and future goals for the program.

What inspired you to create Free the PhD? 

More PhD graduates are produced than there are traditional full-time faculty positions. This is a trend that has been happening for decades. The simultaneous shrinking of the academic faculty pool, especially in current times, has exacerbated an already stressful professional reality for many academics. Many who complete a PhD degree are not sure what they can do professionally afterwards. I was in this camp: not interested in continuing in academia, but not sure what else I could do.  After I made my own career transition, I was inspired to create Free the PhD because I didn’t want that experience to go to waste. 

How did you launch the platform?

It started off as a typical resume-editing service, but has evolved over the years into a platform where academics can do the important work of learning to shift their mindsets from that of only an academic, to a versatile professional. Free the PhD today is a supportive digital community. It’s a set of empathetic, practical online courses to assist academics in the career transition that’s right for them. There is personalized career guidance, provided by fellow PhDs. We teach PhDs how to free themselves from their own mental limitations and become independent job seekers, including guiding them on how to edit their own job applications and do their own interview preparation.

How would you like to see it expand in the future? 

The pool of PhD talent has so much to offer all sectors of society. I would love to continue reaching more PhDs interested in exploring and pursuing diverse career paths. Alongside our own career coaching, we have been doing workshops with different institutions and are piloting a joint career course with a UC university, which I hope might expand into other institutions that would like to work together to serve their trainees.

Why did you want to pursue your MBA? 

When I first began working outside of academia, I had no prior formal “work experience.” Joining a start-up out of grad school meant I was learning as I went every single day, trying new things and loving the experience. I realized I really wanted a comprehensive understanding of business, rather than this patchwork of information to make me a more effective and efficient professional. I enjoyed being in the business world, and wanted to ensure I was empowered to both deliver results and accelerate my career. 

What did you like about Quantic’s pedagogy method?

What I wanted from an MBA was to get the needed information in a streamlined, time-efficient, affordable, curated manner, all from a trusted source. Knowing that the people behind Quantic are proven in online education, and checking out the freely available Business Foundations courses on their app, helped convince me that this was exactly what I needed! Now that the Quantic MBA is officially accredited, I am even more convinced that I made the right decision in choosing Quantic.  

I have leveraged a lot of the business knowledge and frameworks from my Quantic MBA experience, both in my day job and constantly improving Free the PhD. Knowing that I have the fundamental knowledge needed to go out and make an impact in the world has provided me with the confidence that every professional and entrepreneur needs to succeed! 

What is a Chief Strategy Officer? Outlook, Education, Career Path 🚀

So, you want to become a chief strategy officer? You’ll be among an up-and-coming group of professionals representing a shift in the way corporations are thinking about business strategy. This broad, dynamic, and well-paid position will have you handling some of the highest-level tasks in the company.

As the business world gets faster and more complex thanks to technology, many CEOs don’t have time to stay on top of it all. Yet, strategy is more important than ever. As the CSO, you’ll oversee the company’s strategic initiatives. You’ll enjoy a lot power and responsibility, so we’ve created the ultimate guide on how to become a competent, qualified CSO. 

You’ll discover things like:

  • What responsibilities you can expect
  • The education and skills you’ll need
  • How the CSO differs from other C-suite roles

By the time you’re through, you’ll have a solid understanding of this unique role and will know exactly what to expect as you embark on the path to becoming one. Let’s dive in!

What is a Chief Strategy Officer (CSO)?

The CSO, or chief strategist, is the executive who oversees the development, communication of, and execution of a corporation’s strategic initiatives. In other words, you’ll work with your CEO to create an overall corporate strategy that produces long-term, sustainable success for your company. 

Corporate strategy used to be the primary responsibility of the CEO. However, most CEOs already have their hands full with being ultimately responsible for everything that happens in the business. Likewise, the business landscape has become more complex with the rise of new organizational structures, increased regulations, and rapid globalization. These have put a strain on companies’ ability to innovate and made strategy even more important. Yet, CEOs have less time to devote to it than ever before.

As a CSO, your job will be to support the CEO’s creation of an overall corporate strategy. Let’s look a little more closely at what that looks like.

What Does a Chief Strategist Do? Key Responsibilities

What does a CSO look like in action? It’s this: 

It’s Monday, and you’re sitting in a meeting with the CEO plus other executives discussing a new line of products the CEO wants to launch. Your CEO believes that this will help position the company to tap into a new market. However, as you’re reviewing the plans, you notice something: your CEO doesn’t seem to be aware of a competitor who tried this exact strategy just a few months ago. It failed miserably. You speak up and throw out a few alternative ideas for your CEO to consider.

That’s just one snapshot of what a chief strategist does, but it encompasses many of the key responsibilities of a CSO. Those include:

  • Providing insights and advice on the CEO’s strategy
  • Identifying market conditions and determining their impact on strategy
  • Overseeing the execution of any strategic plans
  • Driving decision-making that leads to sustainable growth
  • Facilitating the development of key strategic initiatives
  • Supporting inclusive planning processes and communication between teams, other executives, and stakeholders
  • Tackling various high-impact initiatives that may change the course of the company

Who Reports to a Chief Strategy Officer?

According to Deloitte, a CSO may be described as: “responsible for nothing and accountable for everything.” In other words, unlike a CFO or a CTO, you won’t necessarily have a defined domain within the organization. Rather, if an initiative surfaces that will impact the company’s position in the future, you’ll have a role in it.

That means you’ll need to get ready to form relationships with the leadership of the organization. On any given project, you may find yourself working with:

  • Your fellow executives
  • Directors and other high-level management
  • Department heads
  • Project managers

Who Does the Chief Strategy Officer Report To?

According to a 2020 survey by Deloitte, 69 percent of CSOs report directly to the CEO. However, you may report to the COO as well. That’s more likely to occur if your CEO spends a significant amount of time as the public face of the company. In that case, you’ll work with the COO to develop and execute initiatives and corporate strategy.

Chief Strategy Officer Career Outlook

Chief strategists used to be an odd role that many CEOs didn’t understand because they handled company strategy themselves. In 2020, that perception is changing. At least 50 percent of Fortune 500 companies now have a CSO heading their strategic planning.

Consider Young Sohn, the CSO of Samsung. He’s helped the electronics giant redefine what he refers to as its operating rhythms to better embrace the future of a hyper-digital world.

Deloitte’s survey notes that the CSO role has existed for less than five years in 39 percent of the organizations that responded. That just shows how many companies are embracing this role. If you’re aiming to someday become a chief strategist, now is the perfect time to start preparing to be a competent and effective strategist. As Steven Goldbach – the CSO of Deloitte – notes, you’ll one day play a role in helping a company make challenging, pragmatic strategy choices. 

Chief Strategy Officer Salary Statistics

Ready to make bank? Chief strategy officers are well paid. According to PayScale, the average salary for a CSO in 2020 was $185,539 per year. The top 10 percent of CSOs earn as much as $297,000 per year. 

Two things influence your compensation: your experience and your specific skills. Let’s look at both.

What Sort of Experience Do Most CSOs Have?

According to PayScale, most CSOs come into the role once they are “experienced” or “late” in their career. That translates to ten to 20 years of professional experience. Deloitte agrees, noting that 66 percent of CSOs have over 15 years of professional experience, while some 44 percent have been at it for over 20 years.

What sort of professional experience? Expect your competition to have plenty of demonstrated expertise in things like:

  • People and project management
  • Business administration
  • Marketing
  • Finance

You’ll need similar expertise to become a chief strategy officer. We’ll talk about that next.

What Skills Can Increase Your Salary?

CSOs with a good sense of corporate governance and leadership are in greatest demand. In 2020, PayScale noted that these skills could increase a candidate’s compensation:

Chief Strategy Officer Skills & Qualifications

As the chief strategist, you’ll be involved with many different parts of the company to ensure that initiatives stay on track. As a result, it’s more important to develop a well-rounded foundation of skills for operating at a very high level than it is to develop specific technical expertise. We recommend that you focus on:

  • Leadership skills. You’ll spend a lot of time leading project management, supervising other strategists, and working with your executive colleagues to guide the organization. Make sure you’ve got your leadership fundamentals down. 
  • Strategy. Business strategy is a sought-after skill in chief strategists. We recommend that you learn blue ocean strategy to create the best visions and guide your organization. 
  • Management. If you aren’t already adept at managing teams and people, make sure you get up to speed as quickly as possible. 
  • Data. Business intelligence is a data-driven skill, and companies want their chief strategists to be able to do it. Learn the foundations of data analysis like one-variable statistics so you can make thoughtful, informed, data-driven decisions.

What Degrees Do I Need to Be a Chief Strategy Officer?

You will need an advanced degree to secure this role. While your bachelor’s degree can range from business to law or even the liberal arts, the top executives of most large corporations have an MBA. 

If you’re still choosing your bachelor’s degree, we recommend aiming for a business degree. That will help you start developing the foundation that you need to become a chief strategy officer.

The Best MBA for a CSO 

MBAs are increasingly common among the ranks of top executives, and that includes chief strategists. An MBA will provide you with the deep business skills and abilities that you’ll need to guide an organization effectively. However, people who have their sights set on an executive role specifically may want to consider pursuing an executive MBA, or EMBA, instead.

An EMBA differs from an MBA in that the courses and electives you take are more geared toward corporate strategy and governance. You’ll still learn all the business fundamentals that you need, but you’ll also gain additional skills for the board room. 

Many EMBA programs, like the one at Quantic, also let you specialize in areas including advanced corporate strategy or data analysis. That can give you a competitive edge in a world where MBAs are becoming the norm and help tip you for the role.

Another consideration for choosing an MBA program involves whether an online or traditional MBA is right for you. Each has its advantages:

  • An online MBA lets you keep working while earning the credentials you need on a schedule that works for you.
  • A traditional MBA provides structure and focus and is still well regarded in the business world.

Either way you go, make sure your choice offers a career network to help you develop your professional connections.

The Chief Strategy Officer Resume

Ever wonder what a chief strategy officer’s resume looks like? They’re intense. Typically, they:

  • Are action-oriented. Expect to see lots of bullet points with responsibilities and accomplishments.
  • Put experience first, skills second. They’ll be able to demonstrate what they’ve done, but also talk about what else they can do.
  • Only list the most advanced degrees attained. Unless they’ve also got an MBA, you’ll typically only see the most advanced degree listed. Take note of this if you’ve got a bachelor’s degree that isn’t in the business field.
  • Only list related skills and experience. Got a lot of irrelevant stuff and odd jobs on your resume? Time to clean it up and show that you’re ready to be a CSO.

Here are two great examples of what yours might look like one day:

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VelvetJobs.

The CSO vs. COO

You might have noticed that the CSO sounds a little bit like the COO. In fact, that’s one of the reasons why some CEOs question the need for one in the first place. However, the two roles are different for two main reasons:

  • The CSO is consultative while the COO is executive. As a CSO, you’ll be asked for advice more frequently than the COO. In contrast, the COO will more frequently take charge of implementing and executing operations.
  • The CSO is future-oriented while the COO is present-oriented. The COO focuses on day-to-day operations, but you’ll be primarily concerned with where the company is going in the long run.

Being a Chief Strategy Officer for a Startup vs. Corporation

The chief strategist is much more common in large corporations, where the CEO may not have the time to manage the company strategy as much as they might. This position can take 10 to 15 years to attain and typically involves working your way up the ranks within the same company. (According to Harvard Business Review, 85 percent of CSOs are hired internally.)

Chief strategy officers less frequently appear in startups as the CEO typically takes on the role. However, a CSO can play a critical role in a startup if the CEO isn’t confident at taking the strategic lead. Often, you’ll see the role labeled “Chief Growth Officer (CGO)” to reflect the startup’s growth as a strategic priority. 

If you want to become a chief strategist/CGO of a startup, begin developing your career network as early as possible to make the right connections as you pursue your MBA. Look to connect with someone who’s got a vision that interests you, but who needs a strategist at their back to execute it.

Summary: Next Steps to Become a Chief Strategy Officer

The chief strategy officer is a vital but misunderstood role – we’ve hopefully cleared things up a little bit. Unlike other C-suite roles, the CSO is unique in that it doesn’t have a “domain” like finance, technology, or marketing. That can make it a difficult role to understand. The CSO is best understood as a position that supports the CEO. Simply put, if it involves the direction that the company is headed, you can count on being called for your advice. 

We’ve covered everything you need to know to prepare for such a dynamic and broad role in a corporation. From the skills you need to insights on the best MBA to pursue, you’re now equipped to strategize your next move to become a chief strategy officer. Still got questions? Leave a comment below and we’ll be happy to share some insights.

Active Learning: Giving Students A Leading Role in Digital Learning

The question of whether EdTech is effective is in fact, not a question about technology at all. Nor is it a question of learning design. Rather, the question ought to be rooted in outcomes: Are students learning the material and able to apply what they learn? Are they acquiring new skills as a result of the courses? 

The failure of digital learning to deliver on this promise, as I wrote about in a recent op-ed, is not about how we’ve yet to bear witness to virtual reality or some equally “futuristic” tech, as viable tools for remote learning. The point is that overwhelmingly, technology has thus far failed to deliver effective teaching practices to students learning remotely. The majority of online learning is being transmitted via the video professor lecture, and the lecture, in the classroom or online, has proven to be a less effective method of teaching. It’s the equivalent of watching TV, putting the professor in the spotlight while a passive audience, the students, sit back and soak in the broadcast. 

Active Learning on the other hand, is a method of teaching that gives the student a leading role. They are participatory actors, driving their learning forward, while the instructor provides feedback that individualizes the learning experience. This is Quantic’s method. Our platform prompts students to engage every 8 seconds and provides instant feedback based on their interactions. Only once they’ve mastered a skill do they move on to the next topic; they learn by doing. In this scenario, the student is the star and the outcome of their experience — whether they truly learned the material or not — is the key metric of efficacy. Investments in learning science alone won’t translate to better outcomes for students. Advancements in online learning must come from a two-pronged approach: using the right tech with the best pedagogy and only when the student succeeds should we deem it a success. 

Here’s more on how our process works:

To be clear, Active Learning is not new. Maria Montessori pioneered it within early childhood education, Berlitz with immersion language learning, and Suzuki within violin study. What is new is using this pedagogy in online learning in a way that’s effective and efficient (it’s also pretty fun, too).

Executive MBA Costs vs. Benefits – Calculate Your ROI

An Executive MBA (EMBA) is an advanced degree targeted at mid-career professionals.

The average EMBA candidate is between 32 and 44, with at least eight years of work experience. They have competitive resumes and are poised to move into senior leadership roles.

As one such candidate, your choice in the Executive MBA program is critical. You want a globally competitive program that will allow you to advance your career. Ideally, you also want it to be flexible enough to allow you to keep your job. 

Thankfully, today’s best EMBA programs are designed to help you achieve just that. They offer accelerated programs to suit the busy schedule of working executives.

Typically, the courses take a more applied approach and focus on developing:

  • Business acumen 
  • Organizational leadership 
  • Industry-specific knowledge

Some programs even offer online or hybrid formats. This gives you more flexibility, and thus more balance between your work, school, and personal life.

But, an Executive MBA can also be a costly venture. Tuition from a top-ranking program averages north of $100,000. And although the courses are accelerated, they often run for up to two years.

Choosing to pursue an EMBA is a big decision and a considerable investment. With so much on the line, it’s only reasonable that you should wonder if the degree is worth it.

In this article, we’ll explore the different features of an EMBA. We will also take a look at their value and potential for return on investment to help you make the right decision.

How Much Does an Executive MBA Cost?

When considering an EMBA, an institution’s reputation is critical. And as you will find out below, the cost of a program rises along with an institution’s reputation.

Average Cost of an EMBA

According to a survey conducted by Ivy Execs, the average cost of an EMBA in the U.S. is $75,000. 

The average cost of an EMBA from a top tier program amounts to almost twice that, averaging at about $133,000. For example, an EMBA from:

With tuition fees like these, you’d be remiss not to wonder if your investment will be worthwhile.

Thankfully, you’d be pleased to learn that it often is. 

According to a 2017 survey by the EMBA Council, the average EMBA student’s salary is $172,498. This saw an increase of about 14% after graduation taking the average income to about $197,719. 

This sizable increase in pay means that you will see a return on your investment soon.

“Graduates can expect to earn a bonus for obtaining their degree and an average salary of $164,845. With a significant jump in income, EMBA graduates are able to quickly pay off any loans and completely cover the cost of going back to school in less than two years.”

Dan Scalco, Contributor Huffpost

We also learn that 41% of EMBA students receive a promotion after graduation, and 52% saw an increase in responsibility.

However, an Executive MBA from a traditional program is not always feasible. Thankfully, there are more accessible options through online programs. These offer candidates a more flexible, digital-first, and remote-friendly alternative. 

Some of these are affiliated with long-standing top tier business schools. While others are from accredited independent schools like Quantic School of Business and Technology

It’s important that you understand the nuances of the different programs available to you, so we’ll do our best to shed light on all your best options.

The Quantic program is based on a proprietary pedagogy developed in collaboration with professors from elite institutions like Georgetown, and Insead Business School.

This helps make elite business education more accessible. Especially considering we charge modest tuition of $9,600 for this program.

Consider the following cost comparison between Quantic and other top-tier programs:

Executive MBA Cost Comparison

Executive MBA Scholarships

According to the EMBA Council:

  • 20% of EMBA students have full scholarships from their employers. 
  • 34% of EMBA students have partial scholarships from their employers. 

The remaining 46% are self-sponsored. But they often have access to financial aid or tuition assistance.

In addition, 59% of the institutions that offer EMBA programs offer their candidates scholarships and fellowships.

Clearly, despite the high tuition of an EMBA, you have options to help offset some of the costs. Be sure to check with your employer and school to determine those options. 

This is key information that will determine your return on investment.

At the Quantiac school, we also offer scholarships to eligible candidates.

However, unlike most institutions, we don’t have a separate application process. You will be considered based on your application and notified along with your admission decision.

If your employer wishes to sponsor you, we also offer means and resources for employer-funded reimbursement.

What Are the Benefits of an Executive MBA?

Executive MBAs come with many benefits, including:

#1: New Networking Opportunities

An EMBA brings together a diverse group of people from different fields. It also gives candidates access to an international student and alumni community.

These give a foundation to expand your professional network across the globe. Alumni communities, for instance, help overcome some of the networking challenges executives face.

Additionally, most programs offer an international experience option. According to a 2018 Executive MBA Council survey, 93.2% of the programs offer international trips. Some programs even offer global topics as elective and concentrations.

#2: New Challenges and Learning Experiences

After a few years of working and moving up the ladder in an industry, you develop skills in your discipline. An EMBA curriculum is designed to help refine these skills and turn them into expertise.

It also gives insight into the most pressing factors affecting business today. You will also get to learn accounting and financial acuity.

These are skills that will help catapult your career forward. Moreso if you are looking to move into an executive leadership role.

#3: An EMBA Helps You Become a Better Leader

Most EMBA curriculums include business coaching and leadership training. These help you learn about your managerial style, making you a more effective leader.

Other leadership skills you can expect to learn from an EMBA program include:

Analytic Thinking 

You will learn how to dissect and understand different areas of business. This helps you develop critical knowledge in your field, enabling you to make more educated decisions.

Problem-Solving Skills 

As you work and learn at the same time, you can apply the knowledge you gain in real-time. The program encourages you to analyze your environment and use your newly acquired skills to solve any issues.

Confidence 

An EMBA program will help you build confidence in your knowledge. This will come in handy if you are looking to break off and start a business of your own. Or even looking to get into C-level management.

Communication 

This is one of the most critical skills, especially for those in leadership. An EMBA equips you with the tools to communicate within your business environment.

#4: Better Earning Potential

As an EMBA graduate, you can expect to see a salary increase much sooner than you would with a regular MBA. 

On average, you can expect an increase of about 13.5%, according to a 2019 Executive MBA Council survey.

It also indicates that you are 53% more likely to receive more responsibilities. And 40% more likely to get a promotion.

In addition to these, an online facility like Quantic also comes with a few added advantages. These include:

#1: Student Peer-To-Peer Learning

You will have access to a group learning platform. Here, they can receive class exercises, interact, and build each other’s knowledge.

#2: Executive MBA Student Network

This refers to a platform where you will be able to interact with other students and alumni. Here, you will be able to exchange ideas, grow your networks, and even take part in events.

#3: Group Projects

In the Quantic program, you will get to work in groups on several projects throughout the program. You will also work on a final project where you will get a chance to showcase your newly acquired knowledge.

#4: Optional In-Person Weekend Conferences

These conferences offer an opportunity to meet and network with classmates and alumni. The conferences span multiple days and happen four times every year around the world.

Previous locations have included: Copenhagen, Seattle, Singapore, and Washington, D.C.

#5: Full-Time Job Placement

An EMBA will also afford you specific opportunities after graduation. This is because certain programs offer networking and career support to graduates.

Some programs even offer career networks. Here candidates can get leads to new jobs and mentorship opportunities.

Is an Executive MBA Worth It?

Given the information above, you must be wondering whether an EMBA is right for you. Right off the bat, let us clarify that the degree is an excellent investment. But it might not be the best fit for everyone, or where they are in their career. 

Consider the following instances: 

The key takeaway from an Executive MBA is that it prepares you to move up the corporate ladder.

However, if you are new to your industry or management, then the degree is probably not the best fit for you. It’s also not a great fit if you are a recent graduate looking to get ahead in the business world.

In this instance, you will be better off with a traditional MBA. Or better yet a few years of real-world experience managing projects and people.

Additionally, you have to consider whether you can manage the time commitment required to complete the program. 

If you are unable to commit this amount of time, then perhaps it might not be the right time to start your EMBA.

Another critical factor to consider is employer support. Remember, support is not just financial; they might also need to adjust your work schedule.

Ensure that you and your employer see eye-to-eye before starting your course.

However, if your career has hit a plateau, then you might want to consider an Executive MBA. Fresh technical skills, training in soft skills, and decision making will help you take on more responsibility.

Additionally, the connections you forge during your EMBA will also help propel your career to the next level.

Finally, to work out whether an EMBA is worth it, you need to first determine your career goals.

Ultimately, Executive MBAs are designed to get you to top-level management. If this is your end goal, then the answer is YES. An Executive MBA is worth it and will prepare you for this role.

If you would still like to pursue an Executive MBA but cannot meet the commitments of a traditional program, then you should consider an online program.

Non-traditional programs like Quantic’s EMBA offer more flexibility and low financial barriers.

The online delivery method means that you can learn through bite-sized lessons at your own pace and receive individualized feedback.

An online program will also give you unique insights into the evolving workplace. It will equip you with the skills to succeed in a changing work environment.

Your Executive MBA ROI Analysis

Investing in yourself through an Executive MBA pays off in both ways you can and can’t measure.

You gain business knowledge, broaden your perspectives, and build your networks. An EMBA also positions you to earn the highest salary of any postgraduate program.

But this is not all that goes into calculating your ROI.

The Figures

EMBA candidates are usually above 35 years old with about eight years of work experience. They often hold a management position upon entry into an EMBA program.

On the other hand, most MBA students are in their late-20s with about five years of work experience. They often hold sub-management positions when joining a postgraduate program.

Comparatively, EMBA candidates tend to be more senior, and thus are paid better.

On average, EMBA programs charge about $75,000, 50% more than MBAs. And EMBA graduates end up earning an average of $175,000 compared to $121,000 for MBA graduates.

From this, we can work out the ROI for an average EMBA degree is 133%. This places EMBAs as the most valuable degree in terms of post-education remuneration.

But raw figures are not enough to give a full picture of an EMBA’s ROI.

Education Value

Executive MBAs, unlike traditional MBAs, put equal value on both soft and hard skills. You will learn just as much about people management, as you will about the process under which the same people operate.

This makes for one of the EMBA program’s most valuable ROIs. 

Of course, in terms of investment, this does not qualify as a financial return because technically, knowledge is invaluable.

However, when you choose to pursue an EMBA, you invest more than just money in the course. Therefore, the soft and hard skills you gain from your EMBA are among your most valuable ROIs.

Intangible Benefits

The greatest ROI you can earn from your EMBA is the networks you form through the course.

Micheal Simons argues in his article that, “The No. 1 Predictor of Career Success According to Network Science” is being part of an open network.

Open networks bring together people with different areas of interest and expertise. Closed networks include individuals with similar interests, professional fields, and acquaintances.

“People in open networks have unique challenges and opportunities. Because they’re part of multiple groups, they have unique relationships, experiences, and knowledge that other people in their groups don’t.”
Micheal Simons, Author.

Being part of an Executive MBA program provides exactly that – the opportunity to be part of an open network.

This is arguably the most valuable (and the most unquantifiable) ROI from your EMBA degree.

The Quantic Executive MBA Program

Unlike a traditional MBA, the Quantic EMBA focuses on leadership, strategy, and governance. All while still allowing you to learn everything you would in a regular MBA curriculum.

It does away with time-consuming lectures and focuses on fast-paced, personalized modules. Note, however, that this is not an indication of a lighter curriculum.

Quantic’s EMBA program is based on a proprietary pedagogy that uses active learning. This helps ensure the same learning outcomes as that from top business schools.

The courses are developed in partnership with experts and business school professors. They ensure the program suits the evolving needs of executives from across the globe.

The program also offers you the opportunity to focus on relevant topics in today’s workplaces. These include subjects such as data science, digital marketing, and entrepreneurship.

This, combined with the social learning environment and worldwide classmates, delivers: 

  • Financial benefits,
  • Personal growth,
  • An expanded worldview.

Should You Get an Executive MBA?

An executive MBA can expand your career opportunities substantially. It also equips you with the set of skills and knowledge you will need to move up your existing career. Or to launch a new one.

Although EMBA curriculums vary, most focus on professional skill development and leadership. These give you insight into real-world management problems and how to overcome them. 

An EMBA will also equip you with knowledge from the following fields:

  • Economics and Finance
  • Operational Management
  • Organizational Leadership
  • Entrepreneurship 
  • Business Policy
  • Business Ethics
  • Communication
  • Marketing

In light of this information, it’s evident that an EMBA is a worthwhile investment. Given how impactful an EMBA can be to your career, your choice in school is all the more important. 

Your first instinct might be to consider a traditional EMBA program, and rightly so. 

However, non-traditional programs are steadily gaining traction. They offer more flexibility, less overhead costs, and are more adaptable to your schedule. 

Some even partner with professors from top business schools. This helps make Ivy League business education more accessible on a global scale

Please consider the following quick overview of the Quantic Executive MBA program: 

The Quantic Executive MBA program is specially designed to suit the needs of a working professional. The curriculum provides a world-class education in a flexible, technology-driven learning environment.

The program is also enhanced by the diverse knowledge and experiences the global students bring to the program.

This makes for the perfect setting to network with a diverse group of experts. A feature we’ve discovered is one of the key ROIs from an Executive MBA.

And all this at a fraction of the cost of a traditional EMBA brick-and-mortar program.

So perhaps rather than asking whether you should get an Executive MBA, you should instead ask, “How do you sign up for the Quantic Executive MBA?”

Student Review: Top 5 Reasons to Love Quantic

A guest post written by MBA Student, Ong Shen Kwang:

On November 20 2019, I woke up to an email from Quantic School of Business and Technology: “Congratulations! I’m so pleased to notify you of your acceptance into the Quantic MBA – January 2020 class!”

I was overwhelmed with joy. Prior to the application outcome, I had heard about the school’s highly selective acceptance criteria and its average acceptance rate of only 7% per batch. Hence, I had never imagined myself embarking on this MBA journey. It came as a huge pleasant surprise.

My wonderful experience has passed by quickly. Since enrollment, I have now been on this MBA journey for close to half a year. I am so thankful to have been given this opportunity to be part of the Quantic community that I wanted to share my top five reasons for why I love this modern MBA so much. 

Reason #1: Learn From Anywhere

First, it provides a state-of-the-art digital platform for students to learn on the go. With a fully online platform, learners like myself are digitally enabled to access the portal anywhere, through our mobile devices. This is particularly advantageous for me as I spend about two hours commuting to and from work. Being able to learn on the move allows me to put my idle time into meaningful use. Also, with all learning materials being digital, I do not have to fret over carrying heavy books or having stacks of lecture notes with me. More importantly, this is a great commitment towards environmental sustainability.

Reason #2: Flexible Schedule

Second, I am able to learn at my own comfortable pace. As working professionals, managing our work and life commitment can prove to be challenging. Hence, having the autonomy to manage our own schedules is pivotal. Sometimes, if I knew that I would get busier over the following weeks, I would attempt to complete a few more lessons ahead of the recommended schedule. This allows me to keep up with the curriculum and stay on track. During the course of learning, we are also required to undertake several assignments and major examinations. The good thing is: these assessments are appropriately paced, and we are given a generous time frame to complete each of them. This is a huge relief for most of us, because then we need not fluster over meeting tight deadlines that could potentially compromise our quality of deliverables.

Reason #3: Interactive Learning

Third, the interactive learning and quality content help to reinforce our knowledge. In every lesson, we learn and apply new concepts through a case study that is built on an interesting and creative storyline. There will never be a time that you will feel disengaged in the learning – in fact, you will realise that you will keep wanting more!

After every major topic learned, there will be “Smart Cases” – a graded component of the MBA course – to test our knowledge. I particularly like this segment because it allows us to reinforce our learning by putting our fresh knowledge to test. There is also no limit on the number of attempts; so, we could keep challenging ourselves until we fully internalise what we have learned. In addition, summary notes, supplementary resources and exercises are readily available for us to download for reference. Essentially, it is a wealth of knowledge!

Reason # 4: Passionate Team 

Fourth, I love how the Quantic team is so passionate. Even though I live in Singapore, there was never a day I felt like a stranger to the Quantic team in the United States. Whenever I needed clarification – even before I got accepted in the MBA programme – the team was always there to promptly assist, guide, and patiently lead the way. As a Quantic MBA student, I am overwhelmingly grateful for the team. Their genuineness and passion to help the student community is the reason why I am so motivated to put in my best in this MBA journey – they are just like my family, and I feel like I could always have their back.

Reason #5: Dynamic and Engaged Community

Fifth, being part of the Quantic community is like living in a world without strangers.

On the first day of orientation on Slack, I got to know many of my cohort classmates that live across the globe. That gave me the networking opportunity to know them better at both the professional and personal level. We also frequently engage with each other on this platform, where we contribute new ideas, exchange our thoughts and share newsworthy articles to help one another to grow. It feels like there is an invisible psychological safety net for everyone to feel comfortable speaking up.

At this point of writing, it dawned on me that half a year from now, I will be graduating with a Quantic MBA and I look forward to that day. But I know that the completion of my MBA is not the end of my journey with the school. In fact, it will mark the beginning of a new exciting phase with the Quantic community, where I will continue to render support and contribute as an alum.

Remote Work and Leadership in the Time of COVID-19

The COVID-19 pandemic has swiftly and completely turned the world on its head. Businesses shuttered and those who were able, transitioned to working from home. New challenges arose and managers and executives around the world have been forced to adapt in order to lead their teams remotely. Quantic surveyed these leaders — over 450 managers, executives, and professionals who also happen to be students and alumni of our MBA and Executive MBA programs. The emphasis of this survey was on the 90 percent who went from working in an office to working and managing their teams from home. 

The move to working from home comes with a distinct set of challenges — coincidentally, these challenges are frequently cited as benefits of working in an office. For example, some of the top challenges faced by leaders as they worked from home were communication, collaboration, productivity, and creativity — all aspects that were seen as highly valuable to working in an office environment. 

There were also some hopeful results — most Quantic students felt relatively confident in their employment status and had optimism about the future, with nearly half (49 percent) saying that while they felt COVID-19 was changing their industry forever, 38 percent felt it was evolving into something new, and 33 percent feel their industry is changing for the better.  

Watch the video for a look at the top insights on career and industry outlooks, and what it’s been like to lead and manage remotely during the COVID-19 pandemic.

Download the PDF version of the results here.

The Quantic Student Experience

Wondering what it’s like to be a Quantic student? To start, Quantic’s award-winning active-learning platform is much more than an app. As a student, you’ll engage with a global network of highly driven professionals who are leaders in their respective fields. You’ll have opportunities to discuss coursework and case studies and share perspectives with classmates virtually and in person at meetups and Executive MBA conferences held around the world. 

In addition to collaborating with classmates, Quantic students can take advantage of a variety of resources to help further their learning and prepare them with the skills needed to excel in today’s business world. The library includes membership to paid databases and you’ll have lifelong access to all courses — including those that have yet to be added to the curriculum so you’ll always be equipped with the latest in-demand skill sets. 

Quantic is committed to helping students reach their goals post graduation, too. To support you, Quantic has an in-house research advisor who can help guide your studies and make sure you’re getting the most out of your experience. And our resume and cover letter consultations ensure you’re putting your best foot forward with future career moves. Also, you’ll have access to exciting job opportunities through our built-in career network, Smartly Talent

Interested in the #ModernMBA? See what the Quantic experience is all about.