Series A, B, C, Seed | Startup Funding Rounds Expert Guide

It’s a well-known archetype: the business idea so brilliant, so innovative, the sort that comes but once in a lifetime. A business idea that’s so actionable, it can scrabble its way up from a fledgling startup and blossom into a sizable business. 

Most aspiring entrepreneurs believe that if they can carry themselves safely through and past the first fiscal hurdle of initiating a startup, it’s smooth sailing from then on out.

Indeed, it’s not atypical for some to entertain expectations that their business can spontaneously grow itself into a big enough scale by merely maintaining a firm foothold on the market. 

Time will see us through.

We’ll be honest: It can happen, but it rarely ever does. Especially not in the current startup market. Such a growth model only ever happens to startups that involve the innovation (and often, indeed, invention) of a truly revolutionary product. Something Zuckerbergian, if you will. 

The truth is, most successful startups today are a result of meticulous funding from external entities done in well-planned, recurrent stages. This leads us to our first point of departure into what we’ll elaborate on today. 

Funding rounds for startups.

So, What Are Funding Rounds?               

Perhaps you’ve heard someone say, “We’re setting our books for our second funding round,” or something similar.

Funding rounds are the most surefire way to see your startup through its inception stage into the actual business. It involves consolidating money from angel investors at intervals, depending on what stage your business is at.

Of course, the upside for you is that you get to inject decent capital into your business while simultaneously growing it. Meanwhile, your investors gain the opportunity to put their funds into a worthwhile and promising fledgling venture. 

For a big enough investment, the angel investor will earn some equity in your startup or an actual cut of your proprietorship pie. 

If you’ve heard people talk about angel donors or “seed” funding, these are usually startup proprietors at the very start of the funding process.

However, as the startup grows, both in market share and investment potential, they gain access to different (and often higher) tiers of funding. 

Series A funding, Series B, C, and even D — you will likely deem multiple rounds of funding appropriate should you feel that your startup has grown into its own.

Today we’ll take an in-depth look past the startup jargon and into these funding tiers: see what sets them apart and investigate the differences in timelines across different fields. 

Depending on your startup field or how actionable it is in today’s market, it might take eons to get any decent funding. Or you might skip easily through the rounds and into IPO-level revenues.

Call it the ABCs of startup funding. 

Pre-Seed Funding for Startups

To get a good grasp of what seed funding is, we first need to understand how you work up to it.

Before any external investment can be accrued, a startup will have to do some initiatory branding. Something that validates itself as an entity, a work-in-progress.

Any money raised by the startup proprietors will usually not be included in the rounds themselves and will typically fall in the pre-seed funding stage

It typically covers the costs needed to get the business started.

Other than the business owners, other qualifying pre-seeders might include close friends, family, and other acquaintances close to the proprietors.

Again, the speed at which a startup can successfully propel through this stage will very much depend on your startup’s field of trade as well as its initial costs (think: branding, initial capital, et al.). Monies given at this stage are generally motivated more by well-wishing and gratuity rather than genuine investment intentions.

By this stage, you as the startup proprietor ought to have a clear and detailed business plan and were likely already required to register the company. 

And that’s not all. Your name and identity should be ready and well-defined, as with your company’s human resource structure; your intellectual property is legally protected, and your licensing all done and valid.

Depending on your circumstances (more accurately, the circumstances of those you hope will make initial contributions to your business), you stand to inject an average of anywhere between $10,000 to $200,000 into your startup during this round of funding. For this sum, you will generally expect a 2% to 10% exchange for equity.

How to Prudently Fill up Your Pre-Seed Chest

  • Make sure to spend a good portion of your pitch elaborating on your “anti-fragility” plan.
  • Come up with a compelling reach-out boilerplate message.
  • Be patient, but also persistent. Progressing successfully into the next level round will require some tenacity. 

Seed Funding Round 

What Is the Seed Round?

While the pre-seed funding round helps fund the business idea, the seed funding round helps raise working capital for the already founded business.

This is usually the very first and most crucial round of startup funding. The intention is to use the investment made here frugally and prudently enough to grow the startup and gain the necessary traction to level up into bigger investment influxes.

For many startups, this also usually marks the end of the road for seeding. Why? Either the startup stagnates, slowly faltering until it somehow manages to gain further investment — or the startup proprietor decides to let the business sustain from its current level of revenue.

Investment & Valuation in the Seed Funding Round

The process of investment here is alluded to in the very name of the round. 

As long as your “seed” is well cultivated and the surrounding conditions are suitable for its germination, then a startup at this stage stands at a pretty promising vantage — if it can earn enough money to get itself off the ground.

The first step here is usually an official valuation of the company’s worth. Different aspects of the company are fiscally assessed: its accrued revenues, its risk quotient, the market size, human resource scale, its management track record, and its price-to-earnings ratio.

After this is done, the startup can open itself up for investment from incubators, friends, family, professional acquaintances, venture capitalists, and other angel investors. 

Again, the amount of accruable capital here varies hugely across companies, but a range of $50,000 to $2 million is apt.

Differences Between the Series A and the Seed Funding Round

  • Series A funding comes after a product has been launched and generated a reasonable amount of traction.
  • Seed funding goes to product development and market research, while money invested in Series A is converted into actual working expenditure.

Series A Funding Round

The Series A funding round represents the beginning of an upward trajectory for startups that can graduate from the seed funding stage into larger, more consolidated investments.

Financing & Valuation in the Series A Round

In this round, investment isn’t made only based on an idea’s brilliance or a business plan’s future potential. 

No, the numbers at the Series A round of funding demand that the proprietor demonstrates first, the product’s scalability across different markets; and second, a well-thought-out strategy for capturing and maintaining a healthy market share for the long term.

During this startup funding round, it’s not unusual for interested angel investors to engage in some pitching of their own. Attracting the right angel investors might earn your budding venture access to even larger equity investors. 

This can result from nothing other than the association’s credibility, but it can also come from active lobbying by the institutional investors.

Investors in this stage will more often than not tend to be old-style venture capital firms and private equity investors. They will typically be on the hunt for startups that value in the millions to the tens of millions of dollars.

Money raised in the Series A round typically varies between $1 million to $20 million. 

Differences Between Series A and Series B Round

  • While the Series A funding round might, in some instances, be held for startups that are still in their inceptive stages, Series B funding is always used to scale up production.
  • The equity to which angel investors might feel entitled is higher in Series A than in Series B. This is because the company is generally at a way better fiscal vantage by the next-level funding.

Series B Funding Round

The benchmark based on the demarcation between Series A and B can be summarized by the phrase: “aggressive expansion.” 

In this round, funding is gathered to move the company past its budding stage. Startups that make it to the third main funding round have most likely accumulated a decent customer market share and have indicated to their investors an ability to scale extant market demands.

This is usually several years in — maybe five. Talent gathering, development of a solid marketing scheme, and consolidation of the right technology will primarily occur in this round.

Investment & Valuation in Series B Round

The average value of a business that’s well into the Series B round ranges between $20 million to $50 million. The capital raised during this round of funding averages out at slightly over $30 million.

That said, with the tech bubble being what it’s been in the past decade, these numbers are bound to rise, most especially the average value of a company seeking to attract Series B-level investments.

Differences Between Series B and Series C Round

  • Unlike Series B, workforce expansion, technical outsourcing, mergers, and acquisitions tend to take place in Series C as does expansion to international markets.
  • Unlike Series B and all of the initial funding rounds, there is no limit to the amount of capital influx that’s investable in the Series C round.

Series C Funding Round

By the Series C funding round, the venture is no longer a startup. It’s a well-established company with many years of service under its belt. 

For most stage companies, even the largest firms with billings in the hundreds of millions, this is usually the final round of financing. 

In this round, funding is sought to help complete scaling into international markets, manufacture and release new products en masse, and even buy up emerging competitors. 

The proprietor at this juncture might also feel confident enough to start preparing his startup for an IPO.

Investment & Valuation in Series C Round

At this round, the investors will generally be large corporate entities: private equity stage companies, financial investment firms, and private hedge funds.

The average value of companies that tend to run a Series C funding round is $118 million, but the current valuations as they stand today are usually higher.

This is because, unlike in the preceding stages, investor funding is based not only on the brilliance backing the company but also on actual hard data.

The preponderance of a company’s successful financial track record: consistent revenue growth streams, strong consumer & market share base, accounting reports; all these go a long way to gaining access to Series C-level funding.

Series D Funding Round… and Beyond

Financing in Series D Round

The motivations for running a Series D funding round are usually to prepare the venture to go public. Specifically, to make one final push to boost the company’s valuation as far as possible before the IPO date. This is the most typical reason a company will opt for this round.

Alternatively, a company might press on with the funding acquisition because they have failed to reach their intended financial targets in the initial rounds but still wish to ready themselves for a public offering.

In this case, the company will delay opening and opt to stay private while doing their best to try and achieve their investor valuation targets. 

To do this, though, they will often have to continue with the funding rounds — into Series E, F, and G even, as well as the private equity funding rounds — until they reach an appropriate vantage to go public. 

If this occurs, this round is referred to as a “down round” since the startup will usually have their work cut out for restoring investor trust.

That said, numerous companies have seen themselves through down rounds and into public success, despite initial setbacks. 

A notable example is Couchbase, an interactive database software service, which saw itself raise more than $100 million in its final stages of funding, despite many disruptions that were out of its control.

How Quantic Will Help You Master Your Startup’s Funding Rounds 

Unlike the creative and riskier aspects of startup proprietorship, funding your business efficiently is more a science that requires evaluative skills as well as the analytical mind to attract investors. While still being able to draw up a decent enough contract that won’t leave you without the startup in the first place.

Here at Quantic, we offer consummate programs practically tailored for the aspiring business owner looking to acquire just these skills.

For starters, Quantic’s online MBA program has proven to be a game-changer in many of our alums’ business careers, and we’re not the only ones saying it. Our premier 13-month degree program is designed for mid-career professionals. 

It integrates collaborative group projects with our rigorous MBA curriculum and is enhanced with specializations in management, leadership, and advanced strategy. 

And you don’t have to take it from us. Vay Cao, an alumnus of Quantic Business School and founder of Free the PhD (an advocacy and career development platform for PhDs) has promising things to say about her time at our campus. Check out this case study we conducted on her work and startup.

Startup Valuation Calculator Templates | How to Value any Startup

Are you afraid of losing money and looking like a fool for making a bad investment? The answer is almost universally yes for every startup’s potential investors.

Fear causes an investor to second guess a sound opportunity staring them right in the face.

The best way to overcome investor fear is knowledge. The knowledge that the startup is valuable and will yield a solid return.

The first and best piece of knowledge is an accurate startup value. Let’s get familiar with the different methods of value calculations. We’ll define how they work and when you should use each one.

How to Value a Startup

There are many ways to calculate the value, but no magic number will meet every investor’s needs. The calculations break down into two major categories:

  • Pre-money valuation
  • Post-money valuation

Calculations are broken down based on when the payment happens. Usually it’s before and after the current rounds of funding.

Pre-Money Valuation

With this type of valuation, an investor estimates how much the company is worth right now. It’s an indicator of market confidence in the startup’s potential. It’s not necessary for even a single sale to be made.

This type of assessment can be more difficult to calculate because it depends on where the company is in its stage of development. Such as:

  • Is it pre-revenue, meaning it hasn’t made a single sale?
  • At what point does the company plan to move from pre-revenue to generating revenue?
  • Does the company’s business model contain pre-revenue sales projections?
  • Or if the company is past the pre-revenue stage, will the initial investments go entirely towards capital purchases?

These are some of the questions that factor into the value calculation.

What Is Pre-Money Valuation?

This calculation is one of the two startup valuation methods used before the investor commits funds. It sounds intuitive. But it’s necessary to make this distinction for accounting purposes. For example:

Let’s say a startup is worth $10 million. An investor decides to invest $1 million in exchange for 100 shares of stock. The company value before the investment is $10 million and the post-money value is $11 million.

To lower risk, investors will put money into a startup over later rounds of investing instead of all at once. This invest-as-you-go model is common. The startup gets the funds to grow and the investor lowers potential loss if the startup fails.

Pre-Money Valuation Formulas

Every startup is different. So, calculating the startup’s value is not a one-size-fits-all process. Financial experts developed different types of startup valuation methods. Each one focuses on a different financial perspective.

A savvy venture capital investor will use many methods to calculate value. Then they decide to invest in an early-stage company based on an averaged amount.

The Discounted Cash Flow (DCF) Valuation Method

The Discounted Cash Flow method measures the future revenue potential of a startup. It generates a value based on a large number of detailed assumptions about the startup’s business model. It then calculates revenue over a set period of years.

DCF works best as a type of “sanity check.” Combine it with other methods to ensure the average value falls within an acceptable range of accuracy.

The Berkus Method

The Berkus Method was developed as a way to calculate the startup valuation without unreliable assumptions. In David Berkus’s own words:

It’s best to use this method if the risk factors are known. Also, it works if the return on investment for the startup is unknowable due to too many assumptions.

If Exists:Add to Company Value up to:
Unique Selling Proposition (USP)$500,000
Viable Beta $500,000
Quality Controls in Place$500,000
Partner Agreements Pre-Revenue$500,000
Post-Revenue Success$500,000

Value factors for the Berkus Method

Scorecard Valuation Methodology

This method answers one basic question when it comes to startup valuation methods. “How valuable is this startup compared to similar companies?”

The Risk Factor Summation Method

The Risk Factor Summation Method is a combination of the Berkus Method and the Scorecard Valuation Methodology. It measures startup valuation by comparing the company with other companies. The comparison is used to develop a baseline. It then adjusts the value based on a list of 12 risk factors.

Like the DCF, it’s best to use this method with other methodologies to develop an average score.

Venture Capital Method

The Venture Capital Method takes a finite term approach to the valuation method. The investor assumes an exit term, say 5 or 7 years, from the point of investment. It then back-calculates the return on investment for that period.

This is one of the preferred startup valuation methods. An investor can set the exit strategy on milestones. An example milestone would be reaching a specific dollar amount in sales or percentage of market share.

Comparables Method

Like the Scorecard Valuation Methodology, the Comparables Method calculates a value by comparing the startup to similar companies. Unlike the Berkus Method, the baseline is adjusted by a series of ratio values. The ratios include price-to-earnings ratio (P/E), price-to-sales ratio (P/S), and enterprise value-to-earnings before interest, rather than flat dollar adjustments.

The Comparables Method is simpler to calculate. It relies on fewer assumptions than the discounted cash flow method. But accuracy is more dependent on the accuracy of the market value of the peer group used in the baseline.

Cost-to-Duplicate Method

The Cost-to-Duplicate Method looks at the cost of starting over from scratch in another location or industry. This method can help investors determine soundness very quickly. If the company can be reproduced cheaper or better in another location, it’s not a good investment.

This is a very rough calculation. It doesn’t take mitigating factors into account like tax laws in alternative locations. It’s quick but very prone to error. 

Pre-Money Valuation Calculator

The methodologies listed so far are subtly different. But most have strong similarities. This makes the prospect of calculating value confusing.  

Fortunately, Quantic has published a free template to help.

Post-Money Valuation

Post-money valuation is a measure of the startup’s value after the current funding round is complete. This gives investors a view into how much other investors are willing to support the startup. It’s a picture of the willingness of others to financially back its chance of success. 

What Is Post-Money Valuation?

Post-Money Valuation is a company’s value after it receives money from the current round of funding. This value is an indicator of how many shares an investor will own as a function of the amount of money invested.

If a startup only has one investor, that investor will receive 100% of the available shares. If there are many investors, there’s strong confidence in the company. But this also reduces the percentage of available shares that can go to a single investor.

Post-Money Valuation Formulas

As with the other value calculations, there are several to calculate post-money. It’s best to base investing decisions on an average of the methods used.

Book Value Method

The Book Value Method looks at all the tangible assets of a startup after a funding round. It then deducts the intangible assets to derive a net value. It’s a strong indicator of the company’s value on a Balance Sheet. This calculation only works once the investments into the company are complete.

It’s best to use this method if a significant part of the company’s value relies on tangible assets. If a startup relies on patents and copyrights, avoid using this method.

Post-Money Valuation Calculator

Again, it can be confusing to sort through the myriad of methodologies – both before and after funding. To help, Quantic has released a free template to assess the post-money value of a company. It’s a useful tool for investors to make informed decisions.

Note; ideally, we want to have an opt-in here in exchange for the formula calculator.

Valuation Cap Calculation

Here’s why it’s so valuable. “It is intended to ensure that an investor does not miss out on significant appreciation of a company between the time of the sale of convertible notes and the qualified financing.”

No investor wants to miss out on the benefits of explosive growth. The valuation cap makes the investment more lucrative when unexpected growth occurs. 

Startup Valuation Spreadsheet Templates

In the sections above, we’ve provided a free downloadable template that calculates startup value. It’s specifically based on the most common methods used today. But the template also contains a section for Scenario Analysis. This is useful to help compare the results of multiple methods to calculate the best average. 

Note; ideally, we want to have an opt-in here in exchange for the formula calculator.

When it comes to startups, Quantic has helped plenty of students build companies that grow. But its courses on valuation for cash flow and valuation for equity are specifically designed to help startups position themselves to look attractive for investors.

Finance vs. Accounting: Key Differences to Help Choose Your Next Field With Confidence

We have addressed some of the biggest and most common concerns that many people have when trying to compare accounting and finance. From varying skill sets, different salary expectations, and more, we’ll walk you through the ins and outs of both career paths. 

This is the ultimate guide to study before you make a commitment either way. You should have a thorough understanding of each career choice before you choose a path. This just could be one of the biggest decisions of your life. 

So why not let us take you through both disciplines and help you choose between them? 

Finance vs. Accounting by Definition

They may seem identical but the definitions of accounting and finance are quite different. Let’s take a look. 

Accounting: Accounting is the practice of measuring, preparing, analyzing, and interpreting financial statements. This information helps measure the performance of a business and its financial position. 

The data is also important for the payment of taxes. Accountants use balance sheets, cash flow statements, and ledgers to track daily operations. They focus mainly on the past performance of businesses and individuals. 

Specializations in accounting include:

  • Financial accounting: This is the use of balance sheets, income, and cash flow statements to provide information. This data is used by stakeholders such as investors, tax authorities, and creditors. 
  • Managerial accounting: Managerial accountants use the same information as financial accountants. Internal staff then use the information to make decisions about business operations. 
  • Cost accounting: This involves studying balance sheets and income and cash flow statements to find ways of minimizing the cost of production. 

Finance: Finance deals with investments and the management of assets. A financier will focus on decisions about working capital for businesses and individuals. 

They deal with inventory, credit levels, cash holdings, and financial strategy. Finance will usually focus on the future performance of a business or individual. 

Finance can be divided into three sub-categories:

  • Personal Finance: This includes long-term financial planning for individuals. Some of these include retirement and the purchase of financial products such as mortgages. 
  • Corporate Finance: This involves the financial activities of the running of a business. These activities can include investment strategy and budgeting. 
  • Government Finance: Public finance examines tax and government policies. The information studied will affect how resources are allocated. 

By looking at the different definitions, and a summary of the skill sets, you can see which career path best suits you. You can align your skills, financial needs, ability to travel, and career aspirations with the correct job. 

Finance vs. Accounting Salary

Salaries in both professions will depend on the experience of the individual as well as the industry for which they work. 

Entry-level accountants earn an average of $40,777 and the topmost level accountants can make up to $83,800

In New York, some accountants can earn more than $60.000. The region with the lowest accounting salary is in North Carolina with an average of $44,281

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the nationwide average for an accountant’s salary is $71,550. 

The truth is – depending on the type of career you choose, these numbers can have a wide range. 

BLS states that accountants in insurance and finance firms earn the highest salary at $74,690. 

It’s important to note that auditing clerks earn the least and with negative job prospects, it’s a career that’s on the decline. 

Technological improvements have automated some of the roles, hence the decline in open opportunities. This could also affect the accounting industry to a lesser degree. 

People who have specialized in finance can earn a lot of money as they move up the ladder. 

Median Annual Salary (USD)Number of Jobs in 2018Job Outlook 2008 – 2028Employment Change 2018 – 2028
Auditing Clerks$41,2301,707,700-4%-65,800
Accountant$71,5501,424,0006%90,700
Financial Analysts$85,660329,5006%20,300
Personal Financial Advisors$87,850271,7007%19,100
Financial Managers$129,890653,60016%104,700

Similarly, there are different levels of financiers, all earning varying salaries. 

If compensation is a big factor when considering a profession, becoming a financial manager is your best option. Actuaries are some of the highest-paid financial workers, earning from $150,000-$250,000. 

The Different Finance vs. Accounting Job Roles

Accountants need to be extremely precise as they often deal with large amounts of money. Even the slightest error can result in a business or client losing money. The role requires attention to detail and a high level of organization. 

Accountants often work alone so this role is perfect for introverts who will mainly create written reports for senior management. 

Financiers on the other hand need excellent communication skills and must be able to interact extensively with senior executives. The job requires presentation and interpersonal skills as they present reports to an audience. 

This is ideal for extroverts who are confident and able to handle high-pressure situations. 

Your interests, education, and skill sets may influence how you view the different roles required by accountants and financiers. Take a look at our list of job roles below. 

Financial Officer Job Roles:

  • Analyze and interpret financial reports to advise managerial teams 
  • Raise capital through debt or equity
  • Create and put in place a corporate strategy
  • Budgeting and forecasting (monthly, quarterly, annually)
  • Handle mergers and acquisitions
  • Risk management
  • Evaluate and advise on investments 
  • Implement cost-reducing solutions

Accountant Job Roles:

  • Collect, organize, and track financial information 
  • Prepare financial reports that meet government and stakeholder requirements
  • Prepare financial reports for internal use by staff
  • Conduct audits to ensure legality and adherence to policies
  • Prepare tax returns and report income to the IRS
  • Advise clients and firms on how to minimize tax liability

Accounting vs. Finance Personality Types

Not everyone can be an accountant or a financier. There are personality traits that will make some people more apt to perform well in each career. 

We’ve taken a look at one of the most popular personality tests used by organizations across the world. It helps employers decide if a potential employee is fit for the role. This sort of personality testing can help you determine which profession you are more likely to enjoy or excel in. 

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator shows how people use their perceptions and judgment. The MBTI instrument measures preferences, not ability or character. 

Used by Fortune 500 firms the MBTI personality test is helpful before placing an individual in any specialized role. 

The personality type ISTJ (Introversion, Sensing, Thinking, Judging) is, well-suited for accounting positions. These people are systematic, analytical, and have a high work ethic. 

Known as ‘The Inspector’, they are traditionally serious and loyal. Leaning towards facts, they perform accounting jobs efficiently. Accuracy is key when they have to look through many documents and information. 

Financiers are shown to be INTP personality types. This stands for introversion, intuition, thinking, and perceiving. 

Let’s take a closer look at some of the different personality traits which accountants have vs. financiers. 

Accountant:

  • Detail-oriented 
  • Risk manager 
  • Procedure-oriented 
  • Able to use rule-based thinking 
  • Accountable 
  • Accurate 

Financier:

  • Attentive to detail 
  • Can conceptualize scenarios 
  • Analytical 
  • Inquisitive 
  • Business development skills 
  • Problem-solving skills 

Before diving in, why not take the MBTI test to better understand your personality. Free versions are also available online although they are not the original test. 

You can also check at your school’s career center or your work’s HR department if they offer the test. 

The results may surprise you and they will be key in avoiding a career incompatible with your personality. It will show you your strengths and weaknesses and guide you into a job that suits you specifically. 

Financial Analyst vs. Accountant

After taking the test, you should have some direction as to which job you would like to pursue. Though similar, these two professionals perform very different jobs

Let’s take a brief look at the major differences in daily duties and work environments. 

Financial analysts have a broader job description and their roles are less fixed. They deal with the management of assets and liabilities. This enables them to make future predictions and advise management. They develop investment strategies and are in charge of how to make use of company resources. 

Some financial analysts’ duties include: 

  • Analyzing stock fluctuations. 
  • Creating simulations to forecast the outcomes of financial transactions. 
  • Reviewing spending and revenue projections. 
  • Liaising with management teams to offer advice on financial decisions. 

Accountants have a more structured role and are heavily involved in taxes. They deal with the day-to-day flow of money in and out of a business. 

Some duties performed by accountants include:

  • Organizing company accounts. 
  • Reviewing records to reduce spending and increase profits. 
  • Developing and managing working budgets. 
  • Preparing taxation procedures. 

Generally, both types of employees work 40-50 hours per week. Accountants have a busy February to April tax season where they may work up to 70 hours a week, depending on the number of clients they work with. 

The work environment also differs as financial analysts often have their own offices. Many accountants, especially at entry-level, work in cubicles, although many high-level accountants will likely have the luxury of their own office. 

Can I Combine Finance and Accounting?

The careers are somewhat related, and some employees may perform some of the same tasks. 

The topmost position of either of these professions is that of Chief Financial Officer. It is essentially a combination of finance and accounting in one position. 

With the right experience and educational background, you could have the opportunity to manage a business’s finance or accounts departments. 

CFOs are tasked with the financial planning of a business. They also need to oversee the organization’s cash flow. 

To get to this leadership position, you will need to understand both job roles. You will need to supervise employees and perform tasks required in each profession. CFOs need a combination of skills including:

  • Leadership skills 
  • Management skills 
  • Accounting skills 
  • Data skills 
  • Strategy skills 

Besides a Bachelor’s degree, to reach this management position, often you will need a Master’s Degree. An Executive MBA is a good option if you already have some work experience. 

The Difference Between Finance and Accounting Degrees

Both jobs need a basic Bachelor’s degree but further education courses differ. For financiers, it is advisable to be a member of the CFA Institute. Accountants, however, are usually required to complete a CPA certification. 

See the details below:

So which degree is best? Everything is relative and will depend on your strengths. 

Generally, accounting majors at the undergraduate level are not easy. Students say finance on the same level is much easier. 

If you are starting your undergraduate level, it may be advisable to take a joint degree. It will provide you with general knowledge of both professions and help you choose the best path. 

Accounting does not increase in difficulty at higher levels. But finance does, gradually. 

Benefits of Studying Accounting

Accountants are necessary for all businesses and the profession is currently growing. According to the BLS, accountancy is expected to grow up to 10% between 2016 – 2026. 

Having the right information can help you choose which industry you want to work in. This is a way for you to begin to define a clear career path. 

Usually, after graduation, you may start as an entry-level associate with high growth and earning potential. 

Additional certifications will help you advance your career and get a job almost anywhere in the country. 

Another option is to start your own business. If you have an entrepreneurial streak, you can become your own boss after a few years of work experience. 

If you enjoy systematically working with rules accounting is the course you should study. 

Benefits of Studying Finance

Finance offers a wider range of study options compared to accounting. You will cover a variety of specializations used in the business world. You will also be exposed to areas such as economics and banking. 

By studying finance, you will gain the necessary analytical skills to interpret data. 

The knowledge will also be useful in your personal life. You will learn how to make smart investments and handle your finances effectively. 

The career opportunities for graduates are immense and the earning potential is higher than many other careers. You will also learn how to make extra wealth and not just rely on your salary. 

The Best of Both Worlds?

Advice online seems to lean towards studying both degrees. 

Source: www.quora.com

So now, what is the best way to advance your career? An MBA or EMBA degree is common for both accountants and financiers. It will give you the extra edge over and above your basic degree. 

For this with some years of experience, an Executive MBA will allow mid-career professionals to work and study at the same time. 

If you do not have extensive experience, a free online MBA is your best option. By choosing students from the world’s top universities, Quantic School of Business and Technology gives you a chance to network with fellow students either face to face or online. 

Finance vs. Accounting: Key Differences to Help Choose Your Next Field With Confidence

We have addressed some of the biggest and most common concerns that many people have when trying to compare accounting and finance. From varying skill sets, different salary expectations, and more, we’ll walk you through the ins and outs of both career paths. 

This is the ultimate guide to study before you make a commitment either way. You should have a thorough understanding of each career choice before you choose a path. This just could be one of the biggest decisions of your life. 

So why not let us take you through both disciplines and help you choose between them? 

Finance vs. Accounting by Definition

They may seem identical but the definitions of accounting and finance are quite different. Let’s take a look. 

Accounting: Accounting is the practice of measuring, preparing, analyzing, and interpreting financial statements. This information helps measure the performance of a business and its financial position. 

The data is also important for the payment of taxes. Accountants use balance sheets, cash flow statements, and ledgers to track daily operations. They focus mainly on the past performance of businesses and individuals. 

Specializations in accounting include:

  • Financial accounting: This is the use of balance sheets, income, and cash flow statements to provide information. This data is used by stakeholders such as investors, tax authorities, and creditors. 
  • Managerial accounting: Managerial accountants use the same information as financial accountants. Internal staff then use the information to make decisions about business operations. 
  • Cost accounting: This involves studying balance sheets and income and cash flow statements to find ways of minimizing the cost of production. 

Finance: Finance deals with investments and the management of assets. A financier will focus on decisions about working capital for businesses and individuals. 

They deal with inventory, credit levels, cash holdings, and financial strategy. Finance will usually focus on the future performance of a business or individual. 

Finance can be divided into three sub-categories:

  • Personal Finance: This includes long-term financial planning for individuals. Some of these include retirement and the purchase of financial products such as mortgages. 
  • Corporate Finance: This involves the financial activities of the running of a business. These activities can include investment strategy and budgeting. 
  • Government Finance: Public finance examines tax and government policies. The information studied will affect how resources are allocated. 

By looking at the different definitions, and a summary of the skill sets, you can see which career path best suits you. You can align your skills, financial needs, ability to travel, and career aspirations with the correct job. 

Finance vs. Accounting Salary

Salaries in both professions will depend on the experience of the individual as well as the industry for which they work. 

Entry-level accountants earn an average of $40,777 and the topmost level accountants can make up to $83,800

In New York, some accountants can earn more than $60.000. The region with the lowest accounting salary is in North Carolina with an average of $44,281

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics, the nationwide average for an accountant’s salary is $71,550. 

The truth is – depending on the type of career you choose, these numbers can have a wide range. 

BLS states that accountants in insurance and finance firms earn the highest salary at $74,690. 

It’s important to note that auditing clerks earn the least and with negative job prospects, it’s a career that’s on the decline. 

Technological improvements have automated some of the roles, hence the decline in open opportunities. This could also affect the accounting industry to a lesser degree. 

People who have specialized in finance can earn a lot of money as they move up the ladder. 

Median Annual Salary (USD)Number of Jobs in ’18Job Outlook ’08 – ’28Employment Change ’18 – ’28
Auditing Clerks$41,2301,707,700-4%-65,800
Accountant$71,5501,424,0006%90,700
Financial Analysts$85,660329,5006%20,300
Personal Financial Advisors$87,850271,7007%19,100
Financial Managers$129,890653,60016%104,700

Similarly, there are different levels of financiers, all earning varying salaries. 

If compensation is a big factor when considering a profession, becoming a financial manager is your best option. Actuaries are some of the highest-paid financial workers, earning from $150,000-$250,000. 

The Different Finance vs. Accounting Job Roles

Accountants need to be extremely precise as they often deal with large amounts of money. Even the slightest error can result in a business or client losing money. The role requires attention to detail and a high level of organization. 

Accountants often work alone so this role is perfect for introverts who will mainly create written reports for senior management. 

Financiers on the other hand need excellent communication skills and must be able to interact extensively with senior executives. The job requires presentation and interpersonal skills as they present reports to an audience. 

This is ideal for extroverts who are confident and able to handle high-pressure situations. 

Your interests, education, and skill sets may influence how you view the different roles required by accountants and financiers. Take a look at our list of job roles below. 

Financial Officer Job Roles:

  • Analyze and interpret financial reports to advise managerial teams 
  • Raise capital through debt or equity
  • Create and put in place a corporate strategy
  • Budgeting and forecasting (monthly, quarterly, annually)
  • Handle mergers and acquisitions
  • Risk management
  • Evaluate and advise on investments 
  • Implement cost-reducing solutions

Accountant Job Roles:

  • Collect, organize, and track financial information 
  • Prepare financial reports that meet government and stakeholder requirements
  • Prepare financial reports for internal use by staff
  • Conduct audits to ensure legality and adherence to policies
  • Prepare tax returns and report income to the IRS
  • Advise clients and firms on how to minimize tax liability

Accounting vs. Finance Personality Types

Not everyone can be an accountant or a financier. There are personality traits that will make some people more apt to perform well in each career. 

We’ve taken a look at one of the most popular personality tests used by organizations across the world. It helps employers decide if a potential employee is fit for the role. This sort of personality testing can help you determine which profession you are more likely to enjoy or excel in. 

The Myers-Briggs Type Indicator shows how people use their perceptions and judgment. The MBTI instrument measures preferences, not ability or character. 

Used by Fortune 500 firms the MBTI personality test is helpful before placing an individual in any specialized role. 

The personality type ISTJ (Introversion, Sensing, Thinking, Judging) is, well-suited for accounting positions. These people are systematic, analytical, and have a high work ethic. 

Known as ‘The Inspector’, they are traditionally serious and loyal. Leaning towards facts, they perform accounting jobs efficiently. Accuracy is key when they have to look through many documents and information. 

Financiers are shown to be INTP personality types. This stands for introversion, intuition, thinking, and perceiving. 

Let’s take a closer look at some of the different personality traits which accountants have vs. financiers. 

Accountant:

  • Detail-oriented 
  • Risk manager 
  • Procedure-oriented 
  • Able to use rule-based thinking 
  • Accountable 
  • Accurate 

Financier:

  • Attentive to detail 
  • Can conceptualize scenarios 
  • Analytical 
  • Inquisitive 
  • Business development skills 
  • Problem-solving skills 

Before diving in, why not take the MBTI test to better understand your personality. Free versions are also available online although they are not the original test. 

You can also check at your school’s career center or your work’s HR department if they offer the test. 

The results may surprise you and they will be key in avoiding a career incompatible with your personality. It will show you your strengths and weaknesses and guide you into a job that suits you specifically. 

Financial Analyst vs. Accountant

After taking the test, you should have some direction as to which job you would like to pursue. Though similar, these two professionals perform very different jobs

Let’s take a brief look at the major differences in daily duties and work environments. 

Financial analysts have a broader job description and their roles are less fixed. They deal with the management of assets and liabilities. This enables them to make future predictions and advise management. They develop investment strategies and are in charge of how to make use of company resources. 

Some financial analysts’ duties include: 

  • Analyzing stock fluctuations. 
  • Creating simulations to forecast the outcomes of financial transactions. 
  • Reviewing spending and revenue projections. 
  • Liaising with management teams to offer advice on financial decisions. 

Accountants have a more structured role and are heavily involved in taxes. They deal with the day-to-day flow of money in and out of a business. 

Some duties performed by accountants include:

  • Organizing company accounts. 
  • Reviewing records to reduce spending and increase profits. 
  • Developing and managing working budgets. 
  • Preparing taxation procedures. 

Generally, both types of employees work 40-50 hours per week. Accountants have a busy February to April tax season where they may work up to 70 hours a week, depending on the number of clients they work with. 

The work environment also differs as financial analysts often have their own offices. Many accountants, especially at entry-level, work in cubicles, although many high-level accountants will likely have the luxury of their own office. 

Can I Combine Finance and Accounting?

The careers are somewhat related, and some employees may perform some of the same tasks. 

The topmost position of either of these professions is that of Chief Financial Officer. It is essentially a combination of finance and accounting in one position. 

With the right experience and educational background, you could have the opportunity to manage a business’s finance or accounts departments. 

CFOs are tasked with the financial planning of a business. They also need to oversee the organization’s cash flow. 

To get to this leadership position, you will need to understand both job roles. You will need to supervise employees and perform tasks required in each profession. CFOs need a combination of skills including:

  • Leadership skills 
  • Management skills 
  • Accounting skills 
  • Data skills 
  • Strategy skills 

Besides a Bachelor’s degree, to reach this management position, often you will need a Master’s Degree. An Executive MBA is a good option if you already have some work experience. 

The Difference Between Finance and Accounting Degrees

Both jobs need a basic Bachelor’s degree but further education courses differ. For financiers, it is advisable to be a member of the CFA Institute. Accountants, however, are usually required to complete a CPA certification. 

See the details below:

So which degree is best? Everything is relative and will depend on your strengths. 

Generally, accounting majors at the undergraduate level are not easy. Students say finance on the same level is much easier. 

If you are starting your undergraduate level, it may be advisable to take a joint degree. It will provide you with general knowledge of both professions and help you choose the best path. 

Accounting does not increase in difficulty at higher levels. But finance does, gradually. 

Benefits of Studying Accounting

Accountants are necessary for all businesses and the profession is currently growing. According to the BLS, accountancy is expected to grow up to 10% between 2016 – 2026. 

Having the right information can help you choose which industry you want to work in. This is a way for you to begin to define a clear career path. 

Usually, after graduation, you may start as an entry-level associate with high growth and earning potential. 

Additional certifications will help you advance your career and get a job almost anywhere in the country. 

Another option is to start your own business. If you have an entrepreneurial streak, you can become your own boss after a few years of work experience. 

If you enjoy systematically working with rules accounting is the course you should study. 

Benefits of Studying Finance

Finance offers a wider range of study options compared to accounting. You will cover a variety of specializations used in the business world. You will also be exposed to areas such as economics and banking. 

By studying finance, you will gain the necessary analytical skills to interpret data. 

The knowledge will also be useful in your personal life. You will learn how to make smart investments and handle your finances effectively. 

The career opportunities for graduates are immense and the earning potential is higher than many other careers. You will also learn how to make extra wealth and not just rely on your salary. 

The Best of Both Worlds?

Advice online seems to lean towards studying both degrees. 

Source: quora.com

So now, what is the best way to advance your career? An MBA or EMBA degree is common for both accountants and financiers. It will give you the extra edge over and above your basic degree. 

For this with some years of experience, an Executive MBA will allow mid-career professionals to work and study at the same time. 

If you do not have extensive experience, a free online MBA is your best option. By choosing students from the world’s top universities, Quantic School of Business and Technology gives you a chance to network with fellow students either face to face or online. 

How to Become a CFO: Responsibilities, Qualifications, and Career Tips

Ready to take that leap into one of the hottest roles in the boardroom? No matter your industry, opportunities abound for aspiring chief financial officers. This fast-paced, forward-thinking, and well-paid position will challenge and thrill you every single day.

We’ve got the ultimate guide on how to become a CFO right here.

Like all executive positions, becoming a CFO requires a commitment to the long-haul and careful planning along the way. We’ll help you figure out where you stand and what you need to do to accelerate your path forward while avoiding common pitfalls by making smart choices about your education and career experience. 

By the time you’re through, you’ll have the foundations for your strategy to secure that coveted executive position. Let’s get started!

CFOs Are in Demand: A Sunny, Competitive Career

If you’re envisioning your future as a CFO, make it a bright one.  

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, financial managers at every level have experienced a 16 percent growth rate in their job outlook since 2018, with that rate projected to stay steady through 2028. That’s four times the national average of similar careers, such as sales managers (5 percent) or even other executive roles (6 percent).

What does a highly skilled executive like the CFO earn? According to Indeed, the average salary is $138,374 per year (plus benefits). However, it’s possible to earn closer to $200,000 per year if you’re located in an area like New York City, where demand for CFOs is particularly high.

What Is a CFO? Responsibilities and Role

A CFO is the senior financial manager responsible for overseeing and managing the financial actions of a company. Like a treasurer or financial controller, CFOs often manage an organization’s finance or accounting departments.

However, unlike a controller, the CFO makes decisions that have an impact on the overall direction of the company. For example, a controller may review financial statements to audit them for accuracy and adherence to regulatory compliance. In contrast, the CFO reviews those same financial statements to analyze them before making recommendations to improve the company’s financial performance.

Nonetheless, you’ll sometimes see a CFO referred to as a top-level financial controller, where their primary responsibility lies in overseeing all cash flow and financial planning in an organization. 

The Duties of a CFO

As a CFO, you’ll wear many different hats throughout the day. Expect to:

  • Lead, direct, and manage the organization’s finance or accounting teams.
  • Advise the CEO or other executive members on the financial implications of business plans or current events.
  • Review formal finance, H.R., or IT-related financial procedures to enforce policies or internal controls.
  • Manage or oversee independent auditors.
  • Plan, execute and oversee upgrades to financial systems, processes, or technologies.
  • Relate with investors or shareholders to gain a deeper understanding of their needs and expectations.
  • Provide data-driven analyses and recommendations related to the financial goals of a company.

Who Does a CFO Manage?

Traditionally, the CFO heads the finance or accounting department. Here, you may manage a range of professionals, including:

  • Accountants
  • Controllers
  • Tax professionals
  • Analysts
  • Human resources
  • Investor relations specialists

However, any financial hierarchy within a company will fall under your leadership. In general, if any planning or analysis requires the input of an expert on the financial impacts, you can expect to be tapped for your advice.

The Skills & Qualifications of a CFO

Get ready to showcase your flexibility, adaptability, and willingness to be proactive in supporting sustainable growth. The CFO is one of the fastest evolving positions at the executive level thanks to rapidly advancing technology and shifting expectations about the way we do business.

But technology isn’t the only arena in which you’ll need to demonstrate competence. You’ll need a range of hard and soft skills to navigate your position effectively. You can break those skills down into four distinct categories:

1. Leadership and management skills. Almost everything you do as a CFO involves some form of leadership. Whether it’s managing a team to implement new financial infrastructure or getting other executives on board with a plan, understanding leadership fundamentals is crucial to success. 

2. Accounting skills. CFOs are expected to demonstrate technical expertise in accounting and financial topics. Additionally, you’ll need to have a solid grasp on abstract subjects that have concrete impacts in the business world, such as the time value of money.

3. Data skills. According to Deloitte, businesses increasingly expect CFOs to handle business and financial analytics, using it to make highly data-driven decisions. At least 18 percent of CEOs who responded to their survey believed those responsibilities belonged solely to CFOs.

4. Strategy skills. The CFO is responsible for laying the financial foundation to help a company reach its goals. Expect others to turn to you when it comes time to find that uncontested market space that makes competitive and financial sense. 

Deloitte identifies four key skill sets that CFOs must possess. They are:

  • Steward: Protects vital assets, closes the books correctly, ensures compliance.
  • Operator: Emphasizes efficiency and effectiveness in the organization’s finances. 
  • Strategist: Develops long-term plans to improve the company’s financial performance.
  • Catalyst: Drives business improvement initiatives to keep the company competitive.]

The Most Common Degrees for CFOs

You’ll need a bachelor’s degree to become a CFO. The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics notes that the most common are finance, public accounting, economics, public administration, and business administration.

A master’s degree – usually in one of those same fields – also comes highly preferred due to the level of management you’ll demonstrate every day. Common master’s degrees include:

  • Master of Business Administration
  • Master of Science in Accounting
  • Master of Public Administration
  • Master of Accounting for Financial Analysts
  • Master of Accounting for Financial Managers

Getting an MBA Is a Very Smart Move

Strongly consider getting an MBA along the way. According to Russell Reynolds Associates, 62 percent of all CFOs hold advanced degrees, with the vast majority opting for an MBA. (Plus, executives possessing one can expect a pay bump by as much as 16 percent, according to research by Wayne State University in Detroit.)

However, an MBA is valuable because it increases the breadth of your business knowledge. Imagine trying to understand why a product is underperforming but having no grasp on whether it’s the product itself or the result of a failed marketing campaign.

Or, imagine leading a company restructuring to reduce overhead and improve cost-effectiveness, but proposing a recommendation that inadvertently cuts the company’s most valuable talent.

Both scenarios could break the company and end your career super-fast.

As a financial executive, your decisions and recommendations directly impact the course and wellbeing of the company. An MBA will help you expand your perspective to contextualize your decisions within the organization better.

Today, many different types of MBAs exist. Traditional MBAs can provide more hands-on guidance, while an online MBA is great for self-motivated people who want to work while they go to school. We’ve covered the advantages of each to help you determine which path is right for you. 

Here’s a list of just a few of the elite-level CFOs who have earned an MBA:

Consider an EMBA

MBAs are expected in the boardroom now. So, taking your education a step further can set you apart. An Executive MBA (EMBA) is specifically designed for mid-career professionals and entrepreneurs who want to keep working full-time while developing more advanced skills.

An EMBA curriculum is slightly different from a traditional MBA in that it emphasizes leadership and strategy skills in the context of a corporation. At the same time, you’ll still learn everything that you would in an MBA curriculum; an EMBA is explicitly geared towards professionals seeking an executive position. 

Do You Need to Become a CPA?

Technically no, but many CFOs started out as CPAs. The position requires a solid understanding of accounting, so it will give you an advantage. However, according to organizational consulting firm Korn Ferry, the percentage of CFOs who are also CPAs has fallen over the past decade. In 2014, some 46 percent of CFOs were certified public accountants. In 2019, that number had dropped to 36 percent.

A CFA Can Become a CFO

A chartered financial analyst shares some of the technical expertise of a CPA, but a CPA typically has a much stronger grasp on accounting, taxes, audits, and other skills a CFO needs. That said, if you’re a CFA, you’ll stand the best chance at becoming a CFO by pairing your current degrees and certifications with an MBA. To take this route, look for an MBA program with a strong emphasis on accounting fundamentals to gain the technical skills you’ll need.

The CFO Career Path

If serving as a CFO is on your professional bucket list, be prepared for the long-haul. According to one interview with a CFO, potential prospects typically have around 10 years of related background and experience before seeking the position. If you’re laying out your career planning early in your professional development, you can take steps to accelerate your trajectory – such as picking out a business school with a proven track record in helping students achieve their career goals faster.

How to Become a CFO

Attaining the top position in the financial role takes careful preparation. Whether you’re just starting or are looking to advance your career, here are a few tips to help you out.

1. Choose Your Degrees Wisely

You’ll need a bachelor’s degree. Most likely, you’ll also need an advanced degree to carry you forward. Pay special attention to degrees and programs that give you a solid grasp in accounting plus other financial skills. 

Your competition probably has an MBA, but remember that not all MBAs are created equal. Check out the differences between an online MBA and an advanced EMBA right here. 

2. Gain Broad Financial Experience

Actively choose jobs that broaden your financial experience. In addition to accounting, consider positions that demonstrate budgeting, analysis, risk management, investing, and more. The more well-rounded you are, the stronger candidate you become.

You can do this in a variety of jobs, or you can work your way through one company. If the former, it’s wise to stay in the same industry to deepen that experience as well. Many people also pursue a CPA license for this purpose.

3. Take on Roles that Expand Your Skillset

You’ll need to know more than just finances. Look for opportunities to widen your customer service experience, business and operational expertise, technological literacy, and leadership skills.

4. Join a career network.

Career networks can put you in touch with the right people when you’re ready to become a CFO. Join one sooner than later to begin forming connections. Consider the presence of network opportunities when you pursue your MBA or advanced degree. Some programs have career networks which you can leverage while you study.

5. Pursue Board-Readiness Training

Done everything above? Think about sharpening yourself with a board-readiness program. Deloitte recommends that professionals seeking an executive position attend board-specific training to develop a deeper understanding of what’s expected of you in the C-suite.

Summary: How to Become a Great CFO

The Chief Financial Officer is a staple in the board room, playing a vital role in keeping the company compliant and profitable. Yet, the route to achieving that coveted role can seem confusing, leading many people to feel as though it remains just out of reach. 

With the right preparation and strategy, you can absolutely become a CFO. We’ve outlined what it takes to become one, the skills you will need, and provided some pointers in the steps you can take right now no matter where you are in your career. 

Happy advancing!

becoming a CFO. Read the case study now

Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business adopts Quantic

Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business adopts Smartly to teach all incoming MBA students business fundamentals.

Today, we’re proud to announce that Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business adopts Smartly, a new mobile learning platform, to teach all incoming MBA students fundamentals of Accounting, Statistics, Economics and Finance

Washington, D.C.: Pedago, a new innovative mobile learning solutions provider to educational institutions, companies and individuals, announced today that its flagship platform Smartly has been adopted by Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business to teach key subjects, including Accounting, Statistics, Economics and Finance, to the incoming MBA Class of 2018 before students even arrive on the Georgetown campus.

McDonough selected Smartly after extensive evaluation by faculty and existing students. McDonough recruits outstanding students from around the world, regardless of whether they have studied business as undergraduates. Selected preparation courses are designed to allow McDonough to provide the proper foundation for all of students so they hit the ground running when they begin their opening term with Structure of Global Industries and Financial Reporting Fundamentals courses.

“Smartly is a next-generation approach to online and mobile learning,” Prashant Malaviya, Senior Associate Dean, MBA Programs at McDonough, said, “and we are delighted to be able to offer our foundational courses to incoming students in this format.”

Students will be able to access Smartly’s MBA Preparation Program through a McDonough-branded web-portal and mobile app that provide access to a curated list of six courses that prime students in key areas needed to succeed in the internationally recognized MBA program. Faculty receive access to an extensive reporting tool that allows them to track student progress and better identify patterns associated with the class as a whole.

“We’re excited to have this new relationship with Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business. The business school is known for its excellent faculty and smart students, and it’s a validation for Smartly,” said Pedago co-founder Tom Adams. “And as we’re also based in D.C., we’re hoping this evolves into a broad partnership.”

About Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business
Georgetown University’s McDonough School of Business, the premier destination for global business education, provides a transformational education through classroom and experiential learning, preparing students to graduate as principled leaders in the service to business and society. Through numerous centers, initiatives, and partnerships, Georgetown McDonough seeks to create a meaningful impact on business practice through both research and teaching. All academic programs prepare students to be “global ready” by providing a global perspective, woven through the undergraduate and graduate curriculum in a way that is unique to Washington, D.C. – the nexus of world business and policy – and to Georgetown University’s connections to global partner organizations and a worldwide alumni network. Founded in 1957, Georgetown McDonough is home to some 1,400 undergraduates, 1,000 MBA students, and 1,200 participants in executive degree or custom programs. Learn more at http://msb.georgetown.edu. Follow McDonough on Twitter: @msbgu.

About Pedago LLC and its platform Smartly
Pedago revolutionizes online education with interactive courses and lessons that make learning effective and fast. Co-founded by Tom Adams, Alexie Harper, and Ori Ratner in 2013, Pedago is on a mission to reinvent online and mobile learning. Inspired by a desire to bring Active Learning practices to an educational technology sector dominated by passive video lectures, Pedago makes learning dramatically faster and more effective with highly interactive lessons available on any device. Pedago is based in Washington, D.C. Pedago’s first platform is Smartly, a learning platform that is transforming business education. Developed in partnership with experts from leading business schools, Smartly offers a broad range of carefully-crafted business courses, designed to make learning fast, convenient, and effective.

*Image courtesy of Georgetown University McDonough School of Business