Quantic’s Weekly Roundup

Quantic’s Weekly Roundup is a satisfying mix of the latest breaking news, business, STEM and social science stories. Here are your headlines for this week: 

Mars is partnering with Acquia to create a digital spooktacular Halloween. Mars wanted to digitize the physical experience of Halloween trick-or-treating, but make it more engaging than a website. To build on that idea, the company held a one-week hackathon. Treat Town was created, which is a platform that can be experienced on the free app or through a browser. Candy-givers and trick-or-treaters sign up and create profiles. Candy-givers can design and decorate their virtual door, purchase candy credits from Mars, and decide whether anyone on Treat Town can visit their door (or friends and family only). People can even set different levels of rewards for friends and family and even donate to charities

Samasource, a training data and validation company based in San Francisco, believes AI technology can enhance human-centered work instead of threaten it. Artificial intelligence is an emerging force in the business world that has the potential to either replace humans in certain industries or empower humans with better tools, depending on how the technology is utilized. The company’s philosophy is to use artificial intelligence to empower the human workforce. AI will simply remove more mundane tasks, so that humans can focus on tasks that require higher cognition and focus on higher value areas of work.

The company, PORTL Hologram, has raised $3M to put a hologram machine in every home. PORTL’s projector can transmit images any time of the day or night with its “studio-in-a-box.” Anyone with $60,000 to spend and a white background can beam themselves into any portal, anywhere in the world. The company plans to create miniature versions that will be the size of a desktop computer and will be bundled with entertainment systems like Peloton and Mirror. 

Need something to read this weekend? Sports writer, Jon Bois, used his platform on SB Nation to write his latest multimedia story: 20020: What is the Future of College Football. This is the sequel to his 25-part fiction story about the future of America where football games last for thousands of years and span the continent. The digital science fiction piece explores what would happen if humans lived in a utopian meditation with endless time…and sports! 

Quantic’s Weekly Roundup

Quantic’s Weekly Roundup is a satisfying mix of the latest breaking news, business, STEM and social science stories. Here are your headlines for this week: 

Robo-doping: The use of performance-enhancing algorithms to gain a competitive advantage in esports competition. Esports is a fast-growing field, and that has only accelerated in the midst of COVID-19. In digital competitions, there are no guidelines or rules against the use of simulation programs to enhance performance. Some factors that conspire to enable robo-doping include fast internet speeds, cloud-based platforms, and automation systems. These same factors can also manipulate technology we use in our day-to-day lives. 

Farming tech is getting a NASA-inspired upgrade. In increasingly tight, urban homes, we don’t all have room for gardens. The Rotofarm, by an Australian company called Bace, is a space-friendly hydroponic system, and it doubles as a beautiful sculpture in your home. With a circular design, which rotates plants like a Ferris wheel through the day, the Rotofarm is able to fit nearly five feet of growing area inside a countertop footprint of just 11 inches. 

The pandemic made almost 60% of consumers consider postponing high-value purchases. This lack of clear direction from consumers has put the next decade of growth and market share up for grabs. Some experts are saying the next era must be driven by true creativity and managed risk-taking, which is often inspired by customer obsession, but not defined by it. Expose your teams to new technology, new art, and new foods, and build a sustainable innovation capability to transform this inspiration into valuable new ideas.

Singapore-based smart electric motorbike startup, Ion Mobility, has raised $3.3 million in funding to launch its products across Southeast Asia, starting with Indonesia. Founded just last year, Ion Mobility aims to create more sustainable and affordable mobility alternatives for Southeast Asia’s large population of motorbike users. According to a Statista report, Indonesia alone had roughly 115 million motorcycles in use in 2018, which was about half of its total population that year. 

Quantic’s Weekly Roundup

Quantic’s Weekly Roundup is a satisfying mix of the latest breaking news, business, STEM and social science stories. Here are your headlines for this week: 

It’s your show: A virtual video presentation startup, mmhmm, launched in May as “a kind of joke,” but recently raised more than $31 million in funding and already has a user waitlist. During the pandemic, most of our social and business interactions moved to video chat. This app allows users to change their virtual rooms, backdrops, feature Instagram photos, show content “over your shoulder,” and share immersive slides or live videos. With a simple gesture on a trackpad, you can move your face around the screen, shrink or enlarge your image, or disappear completely. Beyond video conferences, the app can be used for bigger opportunities, like helping creators record and stream more interactive content on YouTube, TikTok, and elsewhere.

Proper LAB attire: The US Army Research Laboratory has developed augmented reality goggles for combat dogs, designed to let them receive orders at a distance. Each set of goggles is specially fit for each dog, with a visual indicator that allows the dog to be directed to a specific spot and react to the visual cue in the goggles. The goggles themselves are not new – military dogs are already used to wearing them as protection in bad conditions or for aerial drops, but the augmented reality system is a new development.

Drive my car: A U.K. startup is creating augmented reality technology for vehicles in the form of holographic displays. The company, Envisics, brings together technologies like computer vision, machine learning, big data analytics and navigation to build hardware that integrates into vehicles to project holographic displays. This provides enhanced “dashboards” of information to drivers, with features like mapping, navigation guidance, and hazard warnings. The company announced yesterday that it has raised $50 million in a Series B round of funding.

What came first, the chicken or the vegan egg: A French startup is launching a vegan egg that looks, cracks, and tastes like the real thing. Les Merveilloeufs (a play on the French words marvelous and eggs), created this 100% plant-based egg that will launch across restaurants in Paris. Unlike its competitors, their version bears the distinct yolk and whites of the traditional appearance of eggs. 

Quantic’s Weekly Roundup

Quantic’s Weekly Roundup is a satisfying mix of the latest breaking news, business, STEM and social science stories. Here are your headlines for this week: 

It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s a… Rolls Royce? Rolls-Royce has announced that the company has completed testing of the technology it plans to use in its line of electrically powered planes– one of which they expect will break speed records for electric airplanes. The new plane will be one of the core products of the company’s ACCEL initiative, whose main objective will be to produce zero-emission planes and engines for other plane makers, and to be net-zero by 2050.   

These boots were made for walking: The pandemic has changed everything from how we work, where we socialize, and what we wear. As people spend less time out in the world and more time daydreaming about when a vaccine will arrive, lifestyle shoes are only gaining traction. Comfortable shoe startups are seeing a big increase. Allbirds, a San Francisco-based maker of sustainable kicks, now has its product available in 35 countries and just closed on $100 million in Series E funding. 

Hey Mr. (A.I.) DJ, play me favorite song: Artificial Intelligence is playing the role of DJ across all top music-streaming services. The technology can learn everything from users’ listening habits, volume level choice and favorite genres. It even works to prevent “dead air” time in between tracks and can pepper in some new recommended tunes on that favorite go-to station. 

Future of farming: To help accelerate the future combination of farming and technology, Sunway Innovation Labs (iLabs) is launching Malaysia’s first urban farming innovation hub in November. It will bring together urban farming professionals, tech companies, researchers and up-and-coming professionals to create high-tech solutions for food and agriculture technology. Urban farms are not meant to replace traditional farms, which are typically in rural areas. Expanding urban farms will also reduce the country’s reliance on food imports. Malaysia currently imports about a quarter (24%) of its total food supply.

Quantic’s Weekly Roundup

Quantic’s Weekly Roundup is a satisfying mix of the latest breaking news, business, STEM and social science stories. Here are your headlines for this week: 

Find your beach: As the Northern Hemisphere is gearing up for colder temperatures, some British tech workers are moving to warmer places. Many workers are working remotely, due to the coronavirus pandemic. Because of this, there has now been a recent spike in some tech workers moving temporarily to warmer countries, while others plan on visiting multiple locations and staying in Airbnbs. 

On today’s menu: Food tech startups in Singapore are serving up lab-grown milk and other edible products from natural ingredients. This type of cell culture technology is an effort to boost national self-sufficiency. Singapore imports 90% of its food, due to land scarcity, and is vulnerable to food shortages and price volatility. The situation was exacerbated when COVID-19 first struck. Efforts like this can reduce the island-nation’s import bill, as well as its carbon footprint.

Always home: Think you might’ve left the stove on or window open? Ring’s latest security camera is a drone that flies around the inside of your house when you’re not home. The new Always Home Cam is an autonomous device that can now give residents a perspective of any room, without needing multiple cameras. Once it’s done flying, the Always Home Cam returns to its dock to charge its battery.

Promoting diversity: Tech companies are looking to take concrete actions to improve diversity within their workplaces, and encouraging others to do the same. Two Seattle-based entrepreneurs, Michael Brown and Don Hyun, have launched Diversity Window: A platform that helps organizations make meaningful transformations around the culture of diversity and inclusion through surveys, tools, metrics, and sourcing. Companies can now analyze employee diversity data, set diversity hiring goals and create reports to share with employees and the public.

Active Learning: Giving Students A Leading Role in Digital Learning

The question of whether EdTech is effective is in fact, not a question about technology at all. Nor is it a question of learning design. Rather, the question ought to be rooted in outcomes: Are students learning the material and able to apply what they learn? Are they acquiring new skills as a result of the courses? 

The failure of digital learning to deliver on this promise, as I wrote about in a recent op-ed, is not about how we’ve yet to bear witness to virtual reality or some equally “futuristic” tech, as viable tools for remote learning. The point is that overwhelmingly, technology has thus far failed to deliver effective teaching practices to students learning remotely. The majority of online learning is being transmitted via the video professor lecture, and the lecture, in the classroom or online, has proven to be a less effective method of teaching. It’s the equivalent of watching TV, putting the professor in the spotlight while a passive audience, the students, sit back and soak in the broadcast. 

Active Learning on the other hand, is a method of teaching that gives the student a leading role. They are participatory actors, driving their learning forward, while the instructor provides feedback that individualizes the learning experience. This is Quantic’s method. Our platform prompts students to engage every 8 seconds and provides instant feedback based on their interactions. Only once they’ve mastered a skill do they move on to the next topic; they learn by doing. In this scenario, the student is the star and the outcome of their experience — whether they truly learned the material or not — is the key metric of efficacy. Investments in learning science alone won’t translate to better outcomes for students. Advancements in online learning must come from a two-pronged approach: using the right tech with the best pedagogy and only when the student succeeds should we deem it a success. 

Here’s more on how our process works:

To be clear, Active Learning is not new. Maria Montessori pioneered it within early childhood education, Berlitz with immersion language learning, and Suzuki within violin study. What is new is using this pedagogy in online learning in a way that’s effective and efficient (it’s also pretty fun, too).

Quantic’s Weekly Roundup

Quantic’s Weekly Roundup is a satisfying mix of the latest breaking news, business, STEM and social science stories. Here are your headlines for this week: 

The private New Zealand rocket company, Rocket Lab, may beat NASA back to Venus to search for extraterrestrial life. The company plans to dispatch its own atmospheric probe to Venus to scout signs for living organisms. Rocket Lab has been working on its Venus mission for months. They plan to have a spacecraft eject an 80-pound probe that will enter the planet’s atmosphere at over 24,000 miles per hour. During its brief descent, it will sample the atmosphere and relay that data back to its Photon mothership before it succumbs to the brutal conditions near the surface.

Buon appetito! Spain’s traditional cuisine is beginning to see more innovative food tech startups appearing on the scene. The CEO of Europe’s biggest startup accelerator, Eatable Adventures, José Luis Cabañero, believes it is due to the presence of “strong biotech research centres in Spain.” From 3D food printing to transforming food waste to packaging, here is a roundup of startups that are changing the food tech landscape. 

Singapore says it will now start paying people to exercise with Apple’s smartwatch. The city-state announced Tuesday that it would reward residents with hundreds of dollars if they use the new Apple health to track working out, health check-ups and immunization appointments. Apple described the partnership as “the first of its kind.” 

“Singapore has one of the world’s leading healthcare systems, and we are thrilled to be partnering with them,” said chief operating officer Jeff Williams.

The business of edtech and digital learning has been booming. Billions of dollars have been invested in tools and platforms that promise to improve the learning outcomes and lives of students. But for all the investments, headlines and flashy IPOs, edtech has little to show in terms of transformative outcomes. What is it about digital learning that has schools so keen on reopening despite the health and reputational risks? Why hasn’t digital learning lived up to its promise? Quantic President, Tom Adams, speaks about the future of high-tech learning solutions and emerging changes in pedagogy.

Quantic’s Weekly Roundup

Quantic’s Weekly Roundup is a satisfying mix of the latest breaking news, business, STEM and social science stories. Here are your headlines for this week:

We have contact: A new Covid-19 contact-tracing app will be launched across England and Wales on September 24, the government has announced. The app will let people scan barcode-like QR codes to register visits to hospitality venues and will implement Apple and Google’s method of detecting other smartphones. Businesses are being asked to display QR code posters to support the app.

Ticket to ride: The Irish e-mobility startup Zipp Mobility has announced that the UK Department for Transport has approved its e-scooter model for trials across the UK. This approval comes as part of a strategy to explore greener and more ‘socially distanced’ methods of urban transport due to the COVID-19 pandemic. The scooters also have nano-septic handlebar wraps, which the startup states reduce the risk of COVID-19 transmission by 99.98%.

Out-of-this-world innovations: For more than six decades, space programs have been developing technologies and making new discoveries. Sometimes, this research is in service of solving hard problems we face on Earth, for instance, developing a vaccine for the novel coronavirus. Other times, astronauts spend their time with less mission critical endeavors: sneaker performance for commercial partners like Adidas. In either case, the discoveries made in orbit have applications that improve our Earth-bound lives. Read on to learn how space labs are hurtling toward the next big breakthrough.

(3D) picture perfect: A team of researchers at Google have come up with a technique that can combine thousands of tourist photos into detailed 3D renderings that take you inside a scene… even if the original photos used vary wildly in terms of lighting, or include other problematic elements like people or cars. It’s an advanced, neural network-driven interpolation that manages to include geometric info about the scene and could revolutionize how 3D renderings are created across all industries by allowing for much more variation in the source imagery.

Optimization in the healthcare arena: Quantic Alum and Vice President of Operations at Focused Software, Anne Michael, is working to streamline data entry, protect confidential health information and create overall efficiency, so that patient care can be the main focus.

60 Business Analyst Interview Questions and Answers for 2020

As a business analyst (BA) prospect, you will face stiff competition from others who have all the same skills and qualifications. The only difference will be your ability to convince Human Resource (HR) managers why you are better.

On the opposite end of the interview desk, HR managers face their own struggles. They need to align potential employees with organizational goals and overall vision. Human capital holds the potential to make or break any business so making the right decision is crucial. 

The decision to move an interviewee along the line depends on your ability to judge their skills based on a few minutes of conversation.

We have just the solution for both interviewees and interviewers. Take a look at our comprehensive list of business analyst interview questions and answers.

Business Analyst Interview Preparation

Before even setting foot in the interview room, you will need to make the cut with an exemplary BA CV. Analysts have very specific job descriptions and these need to be reflected.

You could spend hours sending out your CV, and never receive any response. What is the solution? Joining a career network is probably your best option. This will give you the opportunity to apply to exclusive positions.

Combined with professional qualifications, you can propel your career to the next level. This will save you precious time and give you access to the ideal employer.

For HR managers, sourcing these CVs is the 1st step in finding qualified candidates. The best, (and easiest) place is through an outstanding Talent Acquisition Network.

Talent acquisition has a more strategic approach compared to recruitment. So where do you find such talent, and how do you ensure they are of the caliber you require?

Smartly’s employer platform is one of the ways for HR teams to gain access to an exclusive platform of qualified individuals. You’re guaranteed the highest quality candidates from a pool of students and graduates.

An interview does not begin when you walk through the door. Rather, you need to be as prepared as you would be for a test.

Here are a few tips to become adept at passing any interview:

Do your research:

Before walking into an interview, you must know who is interviewing you. You need to know the company you are looking to work for. This will let you tailor your answers to their specific requirements.

Know your future job:

Thorough knowledge of your future job is an easy way to highlight your specific capabilities in line with the job requirements.

Re-learn your skills:

Invest some time in refreshing your memory on the key skills involved in a BA position. Make sure you can do what you say in your CV.

Study interview questions:

A job interview is similar to a test in which you do not know the questions. Lucky for you, you have the chance to study as many interview questions as possible.

Prepare your own questions:

Interviewers usually ask you if you have any questions of your own at the end of the interview. Ask a few questions regarding the opening, the job duties, and what is expected of you. Ask questions about the future plans of the company and their vision for BAs in the organization. The aim is to leave a lasting impression before you leave the room.

Junior vs. Senior Level Business Analyst Interview Questions

As a BA, your level of education, as well as experience, determines how far up the ladder you can go. Most analysts require a basic business or tech educational background. Success in an interview will then depend on additional skills.

A great way to accelerate your career is to complete an MBA or EMBA degree and give yourself an extra leg up.

Junior analysts generally have less experience and may have recently graduated. One option to accelerate your career as a junior analyst is an MBA program. The traditional MBA program usually requires 2 years of full-time study. It equips you with the business skills to grow in your career.

But how about an MBA that takes only 10 months? You may think this would be a sub-standard program and you would be wrong. The Quantic MBA is a fast-paced, personalized program, taught online, giving you the advantage of earning while you work. With an MBA in your pocket, you will be better prepared to answer these junior analyst interview questions.

Junior Level Analyst Interview Questions

1. How do you propose to compensate for your lack of experience?

This question is key for junior analysts as it is an opportunity to show that you can use your education as a basis to learn new tasks. Explain what experience you do have. The point is to show that you are capable of assimilating new information.

2. How do you think you would fit this position as a junior analyst?

Your research into the company will come in handy when answering this question. Look at the company philosophy and working methods. Be ready to explain how you would adapt to perform in the new role.

3. How do you deal with giving difficult feedback, especially in a junior role?

This is a test of your communication skills. Show that you can be tactful and thoughtful when giving negative feedback. It shows you are capable of working in a team, or in a future managerial position.

4. Can you name two diagrams used by a business analyst?

You will need to remember what you have learned when answering these types of questions. Be sure to mention and elaborate on:

  • Case diagrams
  • Collaboration diagrams

5. What steps are required before converting an idea into a product?

Explain the different types such as SWOT, gap, market, and competitor analyses.

6. Can you name the initial steps in project development?

This is another question that will test your theoretical capabilities. If possible, give examples of these steps in action.

Initial steps include:

  • Market analysis
  • SWOT analysis
  • Personas
  • Competitor analysis
  • Identifying the strategic vision

7. What are the key phases of business development?

There are four key phases, namely: forming, storming, norming, and performing.

8. What are the exceptions?

These are unexpected errors that occur when you run an application.

Senior Level Analyst Interview Questions

Senior analysts generally have more experience and a higher level of education. If you are looking to move up from junior to senior analyst, an EMBA may be the best move for your career.

You probably have an impressive resume with relevant experience. Adding an EMBA allows you to move into a more senior role.

Here are some questions to expect during your interview:

9. Can you explain the key roles and responsibilities of a business analyst?

You may not be able to list all the ‘textbook’ capabilities, so tailor these to your experience. Some may include:

  • Creating detailed analyses
  • Defining business requirements
  • Communicating with stakeholders
  • Planning and monitoring projects
  • Managing teams

10. What is a flow chart and how do you use it?

A flowchart shows the flow of systems using diagrams and signs. Mention how you have used one to make systems understandable for stakeholders.

11. What tools do you typically use as a business analyst?

Refer to common tools such as Rational tools, Microsoft Office, and ERP systems. Demonstrate working knowledge of how you have used them in the past.

12. What is project management in BA and how have you used it in your experience?

Define project management as the process used to attain desired goals as a BA. Explain how you have used it to identify glitches and the goals you have achieved. These could be solutions such as better functionality, lower costs, etc.

13. Tell me about a suggestion you have made that has benefited an organization you’ve worked for?

Take this as an opportunity to show what you are capable of. Prepare an example that was accepted and had a positive impact. Try to relate it to the position you are applying for.

14. What measures do you take to increase your team’s productivity?

As a senior analyst, you will be expected to be a proficient leader. This question gives you the chance to show that you are able to motivate a team. Answer with a ‘team-mindset’ in mind. Explain how you would use managerial skills to help team members achieve organizational goals. Include practical examples such as mentoring or having an ‘open-door’ policy.

“Tell Me About Yourself” Business Analyst Questions

These are usually open-ended questions that give you the opportunity to explain yourself and your passion for the job. Some of the personal questions include:

15. Why do you want to work as a business analyst?

You can explain the story of how you started your journey into business analytics. Give details as to why you are interested in pursuing a career in the field. Tell the interviewer what inspires you to do your day-to-day job.

16. What do you hope to achieve as an analyst?

Employers will ask this to determine if the job fits into your career aspirations. Explain your future goals in line with the position you are applying for. You can touch on ambitions such as attaining a leadership position.

17. What would you say are your strengths as a BA?

Personalize your answer to this question. Be sure to show you understand the skills necessary to succeed in the job role. Discuss both soft and hard skills. Prepare three strengths using the below formula:

  • Awards: Name prizes you have won.
  • Accolades: Mention special honors you have achieved due to your strengths.
  • Anecdotes: Tell a story that demonstrates how you used your strengths.
  • Acknowledgments: Name special recognitions you have received.

18. What would you say are your weaknesses as an analyst?

Do not try to downplay this question. Answering honestly and taking responsibility shows you are aware of the areas you should work on.

Technical Business Analyst Interview Questions

A technical business analyst focuses on using software and hardware to provide analysis that can be used to improve business systems. With that in mind, interview questions will focus both on business and technical skills. Take a look at some questions that are specific to technical BAs:

19. Can you describe your SQL skills?

As a technical business analyst, SQL is key in performing any job function. The HR team will be looking for someone with practical skills such as data manipulation, navigation, and the ability to write queries. If the interviewer is part of a technical team, you can wow them with technical lingo. This will help them understand the scope of your skills.

20. Can you describe the types of SQL statements?

This is another technical question that tests your educational background. You will probably face this in an interview with a manager in the business analytics team. Do not be afraid to explain in-depth your knowledge of SQL. Expand on the types, namely:

  • SQL definition
  • SQL manipulation
  • SQL control

21. What is your experience with technical and functional documents?

All BA’s should be able to explain what solutions various systems provide. As a technical analyst, you will be required to discuss how the system will work. Tell the interviewer you would be able to create documents such as Stakeholder Analysis and Scope Statement.

22. How do you convey complex, technical information to non-technical stakeholders?

The way you answer will showcase your communication skills. Show that you can be relatable, able to create simple mockups, and answer questions in an understandable manner.

23. What are the components of UML as you understand them?

There is no set answer to this question as concepts can be derived from many sources. Be sure to mention components for UML:

  • Structure – actor, attribute, interface, object, etc
  • Behaviour – event, message, operation, state, etc
  • Relationships – association, composition, inheritance, etc

24. Can you describe your experience with UAT?

User Acceptance Testing is the final part of any analyst’s project. Go through these 5 steps and explain how you executed each one.

25. What is PaaS?

PaaS is a cloud computing platform that allows developers to build apps over the Internet. The services are accessible by users via their web browsers.

26. What is SaaS?

Software as a Service is used a third-party to host applications and give access via the Internet.

27. What is IaaS?

This is a form of cloud computing that provides virtual computing resources through the Internet.

28. What is CaaS?

Communications as a Service is a cloud-based solution that is leased from a single vendor over the Internet.

IT Analyst Interview Questions

29. How would you describe the role of an IT analyst in an organization?

This question is aimed at gauging your understanding of the position. Mention the fact that an IT analyst is key in the daily functioning of the organization. They ensure the smooth running of infrastructure and applications.

30. What are your technical certifications?

Have a list ready of your relevant certifications. If you are looking to continue studying, be sure to include these as well.

31. How do you ensure quality in deliverables?

To answer this, refer back to the client requirements that you would have gathered prior to providing a solution. Making sure the client is satisfied is key to measuring the quality of deliverables.

32. After researching a business tool, you come across two possible solutions. One is cloud-based, the other, premises-based. Which one would you recommend and why?

Guide the interviewer through your thought process when deciding on the best option. There is no concrete answer so explore both options. Give examples of when each could apply.

33. Provide examples of how you used data analysis to support your decision-making process.

The interviewer is looking to see if you understand the role of data analysis in decision making. Explain its importance in identifying problems and estimating the impact of possible solutions.

34. Which data visualization tools do you have experience with?

Your answer will show your ability to communicate with non-technical team members and clients. Have experience with at least one visualization technique.

Behavioral Business Analyst Interview Questions and Answers

Behavioral interview questions work on the premise that past behavior is a good indicator of future behavior. 

To answer these types of questions, use the S.T.A.R. technique to structure your response.

Plan ahead for such questions with ready examples and remember to keep the tone positive.

Analysts may face the below behavioral interview questions:

35. How do you handle difficult stakeholders?

How you deal with difficult stakeholders will show how successful you are in completing projects. Show that you can be objective, control your emotions as well as reach an amicable resolution.

36. Can you tell me of a mistake you made? How did you handle it?

The key to this answer is honesty. No one can do their job perfectly so do not try to cover up your errors. The interviewer wants to see that you took responsibility and corrected the error.

37. Have you ever had to pitch an idea to a senior employee? How did you handle it?

The interviewer is looking at your communication skills as well as independent thinking. Outline the steps you took to prepare and the results of your pitch. If you have never had such an opportunity, explain how you would handle a pitch if given the chance.

38. Have you experienced conflict with a peer at work? How did you deal with it?

Using the S.T.A.R method, explain how the conflict arose and how you resolved it. Emphasize on communication skills and your conflict resolution strategy. Demonstrate the ability to understand other people and reach an agreeable solution.

39. Tell me of a time when you had to deal with a lot of stress or work under pressure.

This will reflect your ability to deal with pressure in the future. Provide tactics you use, such as adequate preparation, relaxation techniques, and your change of mindset when under pressure.

40. What is the biggest goal you have achieved as an analyst? How did you achieve it?

Prepare by having your proudest goal in mind. The key is to focus on the steps you took to achieve that goal.

41. Tell me of when you had to learn a new skill. How did you master it and how has it helped you in your career?

Using the S.T.A.R method, describe the type of training you underwent in relation to BA and the quantitative results. You want to show that you are open to learning and are capable of putting theory into action.

42. Tell me of a time when you did not achieve a goal.

Respond by showing that you are capable of handling failure. The interviewer wants to see that you learned from the experience, and can do things differently if faced with a similar situation.

Functional Analyst Interview Questions

Functional questions will focus on what an individual can do. They allow the hiring manager to evaluate your skills, education, and have a glimpse at your desired career path.

Some questions include:

43. What is your experience as a business analyst?

There is almost a 100% chance you will have to answer this question. Be prepared to break down your experience, and summarise it all concisely.

44. Why should we hire you?

By understanding the job description, you can link your specific skills and experience with what the company wants. If your skills are not up to par, emphasize passion and commitment.

45. What are your current job responsibilities?

This is to see if your duties match the job requirements and those on your CV. Expand on the points in your resume and give a clear picture of what you currently do.

46 What is your educational background?

This is one of the simpler questions. Give relevant information on your education and how it could be applied to your career as a BA.

47. What does your typical day look like?

There is no ‘typical day’. This is aimed to see how you plan and how efficiently you organize your time.

48. What is most satisfying about your job?

Your answer will reveal what you believe in as an employee. Speak of an element of the job that applies to the job you are interviewing for.

49. What is the most challenging part of your job?

Breakdown your job and decide which challenges you face, but focus on the ones that can be solved. Choose a skill area that won’t affect your core tasks but can be improved.

50. Where do you see yourself in 2-5 years time?

HR will want to know if you plan on being with them in the long-run. Even if you do not have a concrete plan, show a sense of ambition and a desire to grow.

Analytical Interview Questions

Analytical questions are aimed at assessing your critical thinking. It is a chance to showcase your problem-solving skills and use of data to analyze processes in the organization.

51. How does analytical reporting provide value? Does it have any shortcomings?

Prove you understand the importance of analytical reporting. Do not, however, make it the ‘end -all’ of all decisions. Be sure to include the fact that other factors may not be well represented in data, yet they will influence the decision.

52. In your professional opinion, what does requirement analysis entail?

Requirement analysis needs you to analyze, document, validate, and manage software. Use this definition and the ‘SMART’ technique to show how you have used it in your previous experience.

53. Can you describe the requirements analysis process?

The process involves 4 steps, namely:

  • Eliciting requirements
  • Analyzing requirements
  • Modeling requirements
  • Reviewing requirements

54. What is the most important aspect of analysis reporting?

Explain the impact that analytical reporting has had in your previous roles. Show how you have used tools to provide value. This is a chance to show analytical and critical thinking skills.

55. Have you ever encountered conflicting data during analysis? How did you deal with it?

Show your problem-solving skills. Describe your process (e.g.: how you found the source of the problem and escalated the issue).

56. Can you describe the difference between design models and analysis models?

This theoretical question will test your working knowledge. Design involves raw data collection, planning, and creation. The analysis is the execution, fixing, and reporting of the model.

Marketing Performance Analyst Interview Questions

A marketing performance analyst provides solutions based on insights around marketing performance. They investigate marketing trends that can influence organizational tactics and strategies.

Some questions you may encounter during a marketing analyst interview include:

57. How would you build a predictive model? Can you describe it and the process you would go through?

You will need to demonstrate your ability to forecast future trends and probabilities from historical data. Use your past experiences to give an example of where you used a logical thought process to create a model.

58. What is the most surprising finding you have come across? How did it affect your work?

As a marketing analyst, you should be able to put preconceived notions aside when interpreting data. Showing your ability to be unbiased and open to new ideas could be the difference between you and the next candidate.

59. What type of CRM and analysis software have you worked with?

Be ready with an explanation of the different software programs you have used and how they have helped you as a BA.

60. What recommendations have you used that have increased sales?

Use work experience to show your ability to use data to add value. If you have no prior experience, give a scenario that you would implement in your future job.

Taking the Next Step

Start preparing to ace your next interview and land your perfect job with these questions. By ensuring you have the credentials required and a healthy amount of confidence, you will be well-equipped to level-up your career.

Why not follow Patrick’s example…

Quantic’s Weekly Roundup


Quantic’s Weekly Roundup is a satisfying mix of the latest breaking news, business, STEM and social science stories. Here are your headlines for this week:

Play the Game: Harbor, an emergency preparedness platform, aims to gamify the process of doing everyday preparation for disasters. The program takes a look at the user’s location and the general state of their home to determine types of risks to that individual user and their property. The platform curates a weekly checklist for the user to stay prepared, whether it’s keeping track of the amount of water on hand, or checking the battery levels and functionality of a smoke alarm.

Look Ma, No Hands: In mid-August, the UK government’s Department for Transport (DfT) issued a call for evidence on the use of Automated Lane Keeping Systems (ALKS), which marks a tentative but positive step towards automated driving technology being permitted for use on the UK’s roads, which could see the first such systems hitting the pavement as early as Spring 2021.

Brain Power: The interface for Elon Musk’s brain-hacking company, Neuralink, will allow people with neurological conditions to control phones or computers with their minds. Musk will give a progress update today and hopes to create a “superhuman condition.” The device the company is developing consists of a tiny probe containing more than 3,000 electrodes attached to flexible threads thinner than a human hair, which can monitor the activity of 1,000 brain neurons. 

Seas the Opportunity: Across the globe, seaweed production has doubled and is becoming a booming business. Why? Not only is it used in many cosmetics, food products and medicines, but scientists suggest it can help fight climate change and offset carbon emissions. It can now be used in other forms, working with textiles and plastic alternatives, including biodegradable packaging, water capsules, and drinking straws.